Harley Davidson V-Rod Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys.... HD here tells me the factory uses this process... I want to find a plater that does this as it is much better than triple plating.... Anyone know if this is BS is this a much better process??

I have read many plating sites and nobody talks of this...I hear that there is only a select few that do this sort of chroming
 

·
Color me Gone
Joined
·
27,333 Posts

·
Tired of the crap
Joined
·
2,819 Posts
Hexavalent refers to the "Valence Number" of a molecule or atom, and indicates the number of electrons that it will give up, add, or share when combined with another substance. Hexavalent in this case indicates that the Chrome compound used, CR(VI) has a valence number of six. The little "VI" after the chemical symbol for chromium indicates its valence number in roman numerals. Chromium can only exist in two valance states: CR(III), which is found in food, and is a necessary mineral to sustain human life; and CR(IV) - which only exists in a man-made state, and unfortunately is quite toxic.

For our purposes, having a valence number of six means that the chrome molecules form very strong bonds with adjoining molecules - and having strong bonds means that the chrome plating is relatively strong and resistant to peeling, flaking, and scratching. Hexavelent chromium also is used in paint pigments, inks, plastics, and other industrial processes.

I should state that trivalent chromium "CR(III)" has been used in some chrome plating processes for some time - but unfortunately it has not proven to be nearly so effective as CR(VI). The search for a process that is as good as CR(VI) has taken the best part of three decades, and so far has failed to yield acceptable results.

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce or eliminate the CR(VI) process, since hexavalent chrome is considered toxic and a carcinogen in large quantitities. There is a European Community directive to reduce or eliminate CR(VI) plated parts from automobiles over the next several years. (I believe the propsed standard is to have no more than 2 grams of CR(VI) per finished vehicle.) As such, I personally find Harley-Davidson making "hexavalent chrome" sound like its a good thing to be somewhat ironic.

For riders of motorcycles the toxicity of hexavalent chrome is of little concern - unless you make a point of scraping off the plating and eating it. I should, however, add that it is probably a good idea to thoroughly wash your hands after touching or working with any such chrome fittings. The biggest concern environmental and government groups have with it is that it it can contaminate the air, water, and soil in manufacturing plants.

Due to the negative publicity regarding its toxicity, there are not a lot of resources available over the internet that wil tell you a great deal about it - however a couple of sources you might want to look at are:

The Future of Hex Chrome

Replacing Hexavalent Chromium

and

a simple definition of Chromium six

Lastly, An expert explains different chrome finishes will help shed some more light on the subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
great.... thx for the info...who is doing this hex chrome as I need a few parts done so it matches the OEm HD stuff???
 

·
Tired of the crap
Joined
·
2,819 Posts
Most commercial plating companies will use the hexavalent chrome process for any ferrous metal that they work with. Of all the various processes, hexavalent is the most cost-effective and durable. If you want to have parts chromed, simply call them up and ask them directly - I'm sure they will tell you.

One thing that several people have told me - in most cases it is cheaper to buy the replacement Harley-Davidson chrome component rather than take the OEM part off the bike and have it chromed.

What parts do you want plated?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
triple tree, swing arm ,fork tubes....Can anyone confirm a NAME of a business that does Hex Chrome?? with QUALITY from peersonal experiece

thx
 

·
Tired of the crap
Joined
·
2,819 Posts
SATCOM said:
Sounds like Drew is a Chemistry Professor
Sorry, Satcom - but no.

Actually, I used to own a small manufacturing company. We did a lot of work with welded steel fabrications and hydraulic cylinders. As you know, the rods on most double-acting cylinders are chrome-plated; and as the "boss" I got to read all sorts of scary articles in magazines with names like "Safety and Health" and "Environmental News"... And when you are in charge, they'll blame YOU if someone gets sick because of something that was in your factory. I could also tell you folks about the wonders of SARA Title III, European "Harmonization" standards (ever wonder what the little "CE" symbol on virtually every product is all about?); the intricacies of DIN electrical code as compared to US standards; and the friction characteristics of polyurethane casters versus steel ones.

I guess my years in the manufacturing business also gave me a slight prejudice towards the poor beleagured manufacturer. You literally would not believe some of the foolish things people would do with our products, and then make a warranty claim when the product broke. One common example was operators who seemed to think that a hydraulic pressure relief valve was some sort of magic switch that could miraculously increase the carrying capacity of the machine it was attached to. We ended up putting little wax seals on them to detect tampering - with a decal telling people not to mess with it without checking with the factory first. It wasn't long before our parts department got all sorts of call from people wanting to buy new seals...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top