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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Has anyone ever heard or had any experience with this??

http://www.tcbbrakesystems.com/

I found an old thread on it but there were no responses. I've had quite a few close calls with the VRod already and having it lock up in less than ideal situations.

I figure its obviously not going to be as good as true ABS but maybe its a somewhat decent alternative.

(just realized I probably should have posted this in the brake forum, sorry I must be on crack today)
 

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Just get the slipper clutch installed and you will find heavy engine braking will slip the clutch and alow the rear tire to rotate with the road but still slow you down.
 

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K.I.A. '07 AW
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or find an empty parking lot to practice emergency braking. If your skidding due to locking up the brakes, you're extending your braking distance by a good 50% or more. Each time I make it a point to to do an emergency stop monthly. Keeps it fresh
 

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Discussion Starter #4
or find an empty parking lot to practice emergency braking. If your skidding due to locking up the brakes, you're extending your braking distance by a good 50% or more. Each time I make it a point to to do an emergency stop monthly. Keeps it fresh
I feel like sometimes it skids randomly (like i recently hit a huge oil slick), and other times the tires hold like glue.

I also see on your signature that "dunlops suck". Is there any particular reason why they suck?
 

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durata membro
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Just keep in mind that no system guarantees 100% that the caliper will never lock the rotor and keep the wheel from skidding.
Also,as they have written in their sales story,after market parts like these do not require strenuous testing by law.

From reading the theory of this little thing,it's pretty simple.I think it would work as advertised,maybe even better.
When the diaphragm flexes from high pressure,it uses the air on top of it as an accumulator help eliminate locking the rotor.
I'd like to try a set on my X.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just keep in mind that no system guarantees 100% that the caliper will never lock the rotor and keep the wheel from skidding.
Also,as they have written in their sales story,after market parts like these do not require strenuous testing by law.

From reading the theory of this little thing,it's pretty simple.I think it would work as advertised,maybe even better.
When the diaphragm flexes from high pressure,it uses the air on top of it as an accumulator help eliminate locking the rotor.
I'd like to try a set on my X.
I kind of get the feeling that my warranty or insurance people would have a field day with me if I had these on and had a claim
 

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Tie One On
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Many different road conditions can lend to the locking up including the insecurity of proper braking usage.

When on a corner (cornering) never use "ONLY" the front brake. Best practice is to use only the rear "IN" the corner. If gravel, sand, or other light debris is on the road, especially on a corner, use the rear brake only. When in wet weather, using both front and rear is best practice. When in dry weather, using front and rear is best practice.
When in an emergency situation, if a shift down is possible, do this at the same time as braking with front and rear. Get used to applying more pressure on the rear brake in an emergency situation than the front brakes.
Every MC rider should learn this one. In a skid with the front tire, release the brake and then reapply. In a skid with the rear tire, keep the brake on, do not release.
Obviously, there are conditions like ice or water on oil that some of these braking situations must be changed , but they are the general rule for braking in all conditions on a MC as taught by the MSF.
Practice, Practice, Practice braking for all conditions is a must. Someday we will all need to use them all.
 

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Many different road conditions can lend to the locking up including the insecurity of proper braking usage.

When on a corner (cornering) never use "ONLY" the front brake. Best practice is to use only the rear "IN" the corner. If gravel, sand, or other light debris is on the road, especially on a corner, use the rear brake only. When in wet weather, using both front and rear is best practice. When in dry weather, using front and rear is best practice.
When in an emergency situation, if a shift down is possible, do this at the same time as braking with front and rear. Get used to applying more pressure on the rear brake in an emergency situation than the front brakes.
Every MC rider should learn this one. In a skid with the front tire, release the brake and then reapply. In a skid with the rear tire, keep the brake on, do not release.
Obviously, there are conditions like ice or water on oil that some of these braking situations must be changed , but they are the general rule for braking in all conditions on a MC as taught by the MSF.
Practice, Practice, Practice braking for all conditions is a must. Someday we will all need to use them all.
I have to challenge this "advice". In an emergency, the front brake should always be used most heavily. The front brakes have 75% or more of total braking power. Relying on the rear brake will greatly extend stopping distance, leading to the possibility that you will hit the the object you were trying to avoid where hard use of the front brake would have allowed you to stop in time to avoid a collision.
The key is the ability to fully use the front brake right up to the threshold of lock up. Doing so takes repeated braking practice. Telling people to rely more on the rear brake in an emergency is irresponsible, and definitely not what the MSF teaches.
In a corner, which brake to use depends on the situation. For an emergency stop you will need to use the front brakes, possibly heavily, being aware that using any brake in a corner must be done with more care than in a straight line to avoid a skid. Using the rear brake hard in a corner almost guarantees a low side crash . The best technique is to use some of each.
Many riders will trail brake a touch of rear brake entering a corner at high speed, to set the bike for acceleration after the apex. Other riders do not.
The MSF does not recommend downshifting during a panic stop. Simply, threshold braking requires full concentration, so they teach riders to simply pull the clutch in and concentrate on braking technique. In a properly executed panic stop you don't have time to downshift through the gears.
 

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As some clever soul on the Versey Forum says "a banjo bolt with a built in air bubble for that mushy feel Harley riders love". I think that sums this "innovation" up fully.
You can't lock the brakes if you can't generate fully hydraulic pressure in the brake line. Now, what this does for one's stopping distances vs a well trained threshold braker is up to you to decide. I love a hard lever and lots of brake feel so I'll give it a pass.
 

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K.I.A. '07 AW
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I feel like sometimes it skids randomly (like i recently hit a huge oil slick), and other times the tires hold like glue.

I also see on your signature that "dunlops suck". Is there any particular reason why they suck?
your first statement in the above is the reason I believe the dunlops suck on the VROD if you do aggressive riding. Especially true on damp, wet, or non perfect roads. Honestly, if you're about due for tires, change brands and you will be amazed at how well your bike handles.
 

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Having checked the web site for this gizmo. I wonder why we are looking at steel braided lines to prevent line flex and swelling so we get more pressure to the brake cylinders. Hook this gizmo up and you got your flex action back!
 

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As some clever soul on the Versey Forum says "a banjo bolt with a built in air bubble for that mushy feel Harley riders love". I think that sums this "innovation" up fully.
You can't lock the brakes if you can't generate fully hydraulic pressure in the brake line. Now, what this does for one's stopping distances vs a well trained threshold braker is up to you to decide. I love a hard lever and lots of brake feel so I'll give it a pass.
I think you're misunderstanding what these things are supposed to do. From what I've read, all they do is soften any pressure spikes. That may or may not be helpful, but I find the idea intriguing. The concept of smoothing out the pressure buildup on the caliper isn't without merit. I'd like to see some real testing, as opposed to Jethro driving across a parking lot.
 
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