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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a new trailer, installed all kinds of tie down anchors, everything is ready to go. I have 2 new Bike Pro wheel chocks in place. Problem is, I've had 2 bikes tied down in the trailer, both have fallen over when transporting. The wheel chocks have a strap to go over the front tire, but when tightened, it pulls the bike to the side that the ratchet is on. Both bikes have also been tied down on the handle bars, and the rear. Should we be tying them down on the triple trees? I know not to compress the forks, keep it in neutral, etc. Why might these be falling over?
 

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Chief
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WOW! That sounds like a real mess. When I trailer my bike, I have a wheel chock in the front. I use loop straps through the triple trees and pull forward and down on each individually with ratchet straps. Then tie down the rear at the top shock bolt pulling backward. One secret I learned a while back is to place a carpet covered piece of wood under the frame rails. Once you pull down on the suspension it will bottom out on the wood and then the pressure is put on the whole bike with no chance of the suspension flexing up or down. Good Luck.
 

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Don't think, ride.
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JDSCHMOO22 said:
I just bought a new trailer, installed all kinds of tie down anchors, everything is ready to go. I have 2 new Bike Pro wheel chocks in place. Problem is, I've had 2 bikes tied down in the trailer, both have fallen over when transporting. The wheel chocks have a strap to go over the front tire, but when tightened, it pulls the bike to the side that the ratchet is on. Both bikes have also been tied down on the handle bars, and the rear. Should we be tying them down on the triple trees? I know not to compress the forks, keep it in neutral, etc. Why might these be falling over?
I think you need to compress the forks a little, actually kind of a lot, I did. I tied mine down by the triple trees in front and the upper shock bolts in back and it did not move from Houston to Miami. Your suspension might be jumping out of the wheel chock since it has a lot of play. I would not tie it down from the handlebars, especially if they are adjustable.
 

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Part-time mod
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258C1 said:
One secret I learned a while back is to place a carpet covered piece of wood under the frame rails. Once you pull down on the suspension it will bottom out on the wood and then the pressure is put on the whole bike with no chance of the suspension flexing up or down.
Hmm, there's a good ideer... :thumb:
 

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Jay Johnston
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You are going to receive many different opinions on how to tie down correctly, so I figure I will add mine also.

I tie down the front using the triple trees pulling the bike forward into the wheel chock. Additionally I compress the forks completely so there is no chance they can rebound and cause the hooks to come off. I tie the rear down to the upper shock mounts once again pulling the bike forward into the wheel chock. I have trailered my bike like this for thousands of miles and never had it get loose or fall over, including the time I had a van side swipe my trailer. The trailer was damaged but my bike was secure and undamaged.

As far as your situation is concerned, it sounds like you are tightening the wheel chock strap first pulling the bike to the side, if this is the case I would suggest you tighten the other straps fully then tighten the wheel chock strap last.

If you are of the opinion that compressing the suspension fully damages it then the post by 258C1 seems like an excellent idea. The goal should be to secure the bike so there is NO rebound in the suspension that would allow a strap to get loose.
 

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Formerly BobK
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I have trailerd for years with all kinds of bikes. Without question the best way is to get a Condor chock system that when you ride into it it clamps down on the front tire and you can get off the bike and it will stand up straight. I have used this system with my goldwing 800 + pounds and it still holds. Then I get off the bike and use one ratchet strap on each side as recommended by Condor. The trick is to place the strap correctly, rather low and in the middle if you can and then only go a little forward and out a little. I just came back from a western U.S. ride where I trailered my Goldwing from Chicago to Colorado on an open trailer that I can see the bike and with only the two straps and the Condor chock system the bike didn't move at all including bumps and fast turns. The trick to trailering is to have the proper system. With my V Rod I tie from the top of the shock mount and slightly forward and the bike never moves. I have even had straps loosen and when I saw the bike swaying I went back and found the straps were completely loose and only the Condor was holding the bike. I have no connection to Condor other than being a completely satisfied customer. Another thing about their system is that it has quick disconnect mounts so 2 units will work for two bikes and then when you only trailer one bike you move the chock to the middle.
 

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I use ancra tie downs cam style are the easiest, use a soft strapt around the handle bars and forward to your anchor.You have to compress your shocks quite a bit.
 

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LOS ANGELES
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Electro said:
Why are you putting it on a trailer? Is it broke?:confused:
Because after a while, the bike gets tired.. :stilpoke:
 

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Qwk Rod said:
I have trailerd for years with all kinds of bikes. Without question the best way is to get a Condor chock system that when you ride into it it clamps down on the front tire and you can get off the bike and it will stand up straight. I have used this system with my goldwing 800 + pounds and it still holds. Then I get off the bike and use one ratchet strap on each side as recommended by Condor. The trick is to place the strap correctly, rather low and in the middle if you can and then only go a little forward and out a little. I just came back from a western U.S. ride where I trailered my Goldwing from Chicago to Colorado on an open trailer that I can see the bike and with only the two straps and the Condor chock system the bike didn't move at all including bumps and fast turns. The trick to trailering is to have the proper system. With my V Rod I tie from the top of the shock mount and slightly forward and the bike never moves. I have even had straps loosen and when I saw the bike swaying I went back and found the straps were completely loose and only the Condor was holding the bike. I have no connection to Condor other than being a completely satisfied customer. Another thing about their system is that it has quick disconnect mounts so 2 units will work for two bikes and then when you only trailer one bike you move the chock to the middle.

Ditto, Condor is the only way to go, we do a two bike trailer back and forth between Fl and NY each year, and never a problem. I do the tie downs from the triple tree, and my partners Fat Boy from the handle bars, works great.
 

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Formerly BobK
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drhydra said:
Ditto, Condor is the only way to go, we do a two bike trailer back and forth between Fl and NY each year, and never a problem. I do the tie downs from the triple tree, and my partners Fat Boy from the handle bars, works great.
I make the same trip from Chicago to Ft Lauderdale every year also. If you try tieing them the way I described as per Condor you will find that the bikes won't sway at all and you won't have to compress the fork springs as much. Also most chock people and the bike companies frown on tieing to the handlebars as they are not strong enough. JMHO
 

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Formerly BobK
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Speed limit exempt
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey all, just wanted to thank you all for the input. I have Bike Pro chocks, tied down to the triple trees and rear footpeg mounts, also have a tie down to go over the front tire. Also, I used wood under the frame to prevent the suspension from compressing and loosening the tie downs. After all that, went to OCMD and back with 2 bikes, didn't move an inch, even after hitting some pretty gnarly bumps and stuff. All in all a great weekend. Thanks again for the input!

JD
 
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