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Hey guys i am new here so be gentle !! LOL! I am looking at a 06 r model ! I can get this bike right (good price ) and the thing is in pristine condition but here's my reason's for not already finishing the deal !! (of course ) Mid controls ! I like sprawling out on rides and relaxing , Handlebar heights , and i guess just being the sport bike ! I am an avid harley owner and would own nothing but ! My ride is getting old(still purrs though) and it's time to upgrade ! Can't afford to go buy brand new but would like to get new bike ! Thanks guys in advance!!:bash::banghead:
 

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REVOLUTION !!!
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Welcome to 1130cc.com - sounds like you need to look at other Vrod models such as an A,AW, B, DX to get away from the issue with mid controls...
 

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I'm a big R fan but I'm with stomper in that you may be better off with an A or such. It's probably more cost effective to get all the features you like as opposed to converting an R into a cruiser style. It gets very expensive. What's the $ you can get the R for?
 

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Live Free Or Die
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Each to his own regarding the which VRSC

I specifically didn't buy another Vrod model other than the R because of their riding positions.

As an old dirt bike rider, there's two things that I absolutely need in a motorcycle: 1) my feet under me when I maneuver my bike. 2) to be able to get up over the bars and see where my front tire is headed, when needed. Yes I know that it's flat pavement I ride on, but after growing up riding off road, I can't change the way that I ride. Nor do I want to as I belive that I'm a better, safer rider on the road because of my off road experience.

I simply don't understand how people can ride comfortably (and safely) in either a semi reclining laid back or stretched out laying over the tank position. On my R I changed out the bars to give me an upright ride and to stretch out on long rides I installed an engine guard with foot pegs.

Each to his own.
 

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Asatruar
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If mid-controls & the handlebars on the "R" trouble you, then you'll not care for the seat either. And you are limited by options for changing it. Seats meant for the other models won't fit.

It's also my understanding that rear fenders aren't interchangeable with other models either.

Then the next thing you're likely to want to do is lower the rear. There's only so low you can go before running into issues with hitting the gas tank.

(H-D may call it a fuel cell but that doesn't make it one.)

A better plan is to just buy the model that's right for you in the first place.

The Street Rod is what it is, and for some that's enough.
 

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Free At Last
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If it's the wrong bike for you, a good deal still doesn't make it right. But whoever you sell it to will really do well. They might even thank you.

Bottom line: look at what you really want. Worth the time and money. And living in Maine, you have plenty of time before winter ends and it gets nice for riding.
 

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Rider
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You've got to take a long test ride to see if it will work. I traded a Harley Softail with forward controls that I could only ride for about 2 hours before getting leg cramps. I can ride the R much longer with much greater comfort. Doesn't mean it will be that way for you. The only way to find out is to ride it. And remember, there are guys that put well over 100,000 miles on BMW GS bikes with mid controls and love the comfort. Mid controls can work very well for many people.
 

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Mid controls work for the vast majority of the people that ride any kind of distance. You have better balance, control, comfort, and shock absorption with your feet under you. Feet forward may look cool, and be initally comfortable, but after a bunch of miles and some bimps, your back and butt will tell a different story.
 

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I think the forward control perception comes from the lazy-boy recliner while eating a TV dinner profile. But there's no such support on the bike! It sure is nice to move your feet around on a long trip. The best of both worlds is mid controls and a hiway bar with some pegs up front to change positions when your legs get tired. Some guys who like forwards even put pegs amidships for the same reason.

The one real bad thing about forwards is you cannot unload the seat if you need to so your back gets slammed on rough surfaces where the suspension is taxed.
 

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I think the forward control perception comes from the lazy-boy recliner while eating a TV dinner profile. But there's no such support on the bike! It sure is nice to move your feet around on a long trip. The best of both worlds is mid controls and a hiway bar with some pegs up front to change positions when your legs get tired. Some guys who like forwards even put pegs amidships for the same reason.

The one real bad thing about forwards is you cannot unload the seat if you need to so your back gets slammed on rough surfaces where the suspension is taxed.

I noticed the MSF Basic course has stopped teaching students to ride over a 4X4 precisely because so many bikes have forward controls and the riders cannot stand up on the pegs to clear the piece of lumber.

I heard a rider describe the forward control position as the same as riding a horse. With our agrarian heritage, who knows? We race on horse race tracks, so maybe it's true.
 

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If mid-controls & the handlebars on the "R" trouble you, then you'll not care for the seat either. And you are limited by options for changing it. Seats meant for the other models won't fit.

It's also my understanding that rear fenders aren't interchangeable with other models either.

Then the next thing you're likely to want to do is lower the rear. There's only so low you can go before running into issues with hitting the gas tank.

(H-D may call it a fuel cell but that doesn't make it one.)

A better plan is to just buy the model that's right for you in the first place.

The Street Rod is what it is, and for some that's enough.
Eh, maybe not. I raised the rear of mine with longer travel shocks to gain some cornering clearance, quicken up the steering a smidge and gain some suspension travel out back. But, as you say, measure carefully to prevent the swingarm cross member from fouling the fuel cell.
The Sundowner Riders Saddle will buy you a bit of leg room. I'm just under six feet and the bike is comfortable for long trips, like California to Utah basically non stop.
I love my R. It does everything well and is very refined. It is put together well too.
 

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Asatruar
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Eh, maybe not. I raised the rear of mine with longer travel shocks to gain some cornering clearance, quicken up the steering a smidge and gain some suspension travel out back. But, as you say, measure carefully to prevent the swingarm cross member from fouling the fuel cell.
The Sundowner Riders Saddle will buy you a bit of leg room. I'm just under six feet and the bike is comfortable for long trips, like California to Utah basically non stop.
I love my R. It does everything well and is very refined. It is put together well too.
Yes,but the original poster admitted that the mid-mount controls, handlebar height & the "sport bike'' aspect of the "R" were reasons for his holding off on finalizing the purchase.

It seemed to me that the lowering the bike & changing out the seat would also be among the things that would be considered by someone who "likes sprawling out on rides and relaxing." As for myself, the stock shock length is fine.

My Street Rod came with the Sundowner Saddle. It doesn't work for me. I'm aware of my options for remedying that situation.

I too love my "R",not only for what it can be but also
for what it is.
 

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I noticed the MSF Basic course has stopped teaching students to ride over a 4X4 precisely because so many bikes have forward controls and the riders cannot stand up on the pegs to clear the piece of lumber.


Had to vault an aluminum stepladder on I-8 once. It was bad enough but with my ass firmly on the seat I think it would have been really ugly. Broken back, ejected maybe. I snapped the throttle shut, stood up a bit went throttle open pulling on the bars trying to unload the front end a bit but the FXR crunched in obscenely, went airborne way nosedown and returned to terra firma bottoming front first and then the rear slammed so hard I thought the shock bolts would shear. I beleive the ladder rotated under the frame and levered the bike way up based on some scratches on the bottom and my oil filter was mashed. My wrists hurt for days, quite violent. I was NOT looking ahead far enough and when the ladder appeared there was no time to jink. It did stay pretty straight. Watch for trucks with stuff on back and get away ASAP.
 

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If it is just the position you are worried about then maybe your worries are for nothing. The mid mount controls and moderate rise bar makes for a very comfortable position that also gives better control over the bike. Sure it is NOT the traditional harley foot forward position... but probably once you get used to mid mount controls you wont want to go back... a test ride might help... but anything different from what you are used to is going to feel awkward at first... so try to take several loooong test rides if possible... small changes can be made later... slightly higher or lower bars/taller or shorter seat etc... The R is by far the best performing of the bunch and very reliable... best of luck to you!
 

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'Rich could be right. You might like it afterall and you can put a hiway bar and pegs up front for lounging on long rides. But the R will never have the long,low dragster look like a NRS or similar. Even if you (ughh)slam it,the frame is still higher in the seat area. What's your predilection?
 

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Gone
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It's news to me that you can't stand up with forward controls. I do all the time and mine are extended farther with reduced reach parts on backwards. You people saying one position is good and another is bad are foolish. All the positions have plusses and minuses and should be picked based on what you personally want. I didn't want a bike for long rides cross country, most of the country is a shithole anyway. I bought what I wanted, a fast for me cruiser to cruise up to 200 miles per day with and go somewhat fast, especially from 0 to slightly legal speeds, occasionally. And to do it with some slightly unique look and style. It turned out to be exactly the best bike I could have possibly chosen for that purpose.

If you want forward controls and/or a lower bike than an R then DO NOT BUY AN R. That's as simple as possible right there.
 

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Rider
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If you want forward controls and/or a lower bike than an R then DO NOT BUY AN R. That's as simple as possible right there.
Simpler yet: Figure out what you want first. Riding for long enough to see if it is comfortable is essential. My worst bike purchases have been buying a certain look, without regard to the feel of the bike. Ride one and find out if you like it.
 

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Retired, Not SLOW!
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I noticed the MSF Basic course has stopped teaching students to ride over a 4X4 precisely because so many bikes have forward controls and the riders cannot stand up on the pegs to clear the piece of lumber.

I heard a rider describe the forward control position as the same as riding a horse. With our agrarian heritage, who knows? We race on horse race tracks, so maybe it's true.
Granted that it's been a while (since 1967 to be exact), but when I last rode a horse my feet were directly under me and I could stand up in the stirrups. I don't think one could ride a horse at speed without having the ability to take weight off the saddle.
 
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