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Charlie
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99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got finished putting my bike back together after installing a Rick's Tank. Also decided to put in a new chrome swing-arm and a new Metzeler rear tire while the bike was apart.

No major problems were encountered during the install thanks to the service manual and all the tips from this forum.

Thanks to Max for letting me borrow one of his fuel tank flange removal tools and to Jerry for helping me with the new base plate and muffler installation.
 

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Color me Gone
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27,333 Posts
Glad to hear your back on the road. I guess thats one down and two to go now. :)
 

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Heath
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389 Posts
What kind of bike lift are you using?
 

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Chief
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1,272 Posts
Welcome to the Rick's tank family!!!
 

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Charlie
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99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Max said:
Glad to hear your back on the road. I guess thats one down and two to go now. :)
Correct! I am waiting for 2 more tanks to arrive. One will go on Els' 2004 VRSCB while the other will go to Jerry to repay him for lending me his tank from the group buy.

Els will also be getting a new rear Metzeler as well as a new black, powder-coated swingarm to replace her stock polished one.
 

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Charlie
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99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
PurpRod said:
What kind of bike lift are you using?
I bought it at Harbor Freight Tools about 6 months ago -- around $60 as I recall. It's an ATV lift with a 1500 lb. capacity. It goes under our V-Rod frames cleanly as long as the bike is straight and no one is sitting on it.
 

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Charlie
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99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Max said:
Glad to hear your back on the road. I guess thats one down and two to go now. :)
I learned 2 valuable lessons druing this install:

1. It takes a long time to drill a hole in the V-Rod frame if you have your drill in reverse. :)

2. It's very difficult to get the mufflers back on with the bike on a lift. Much easier on the kick stand. :)
 

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Vendor
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5,940 Posts
charlieh said:
1. It takes a long time to drill a hole in the V-Rod frame if you have your drill in reverse. :)

AAAAAAAAH yes the good ole reverse drilling will get you everytime. I remember doing that in college when I was in my first machining class with a massive hangover. Went to my teachers aide/ student and said," DUDE this wont drill!?" he said," DUDE its in reverse!" Enough said!:banghead:
 

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Charlie
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99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jackflash said:
How did the install go? Generally easy/difficult? Hit any snags?
I had never attempted anything of this magnitude on my bike. I researched this forum before tackling the job to make sure I had all the right tools.

If you have a service manual and all the right tools, I would rate this job as medium difficulty but quite doable for anyone that can follow the directions in the service manual.

Only snag for me was removal of the rear brake caliper because I have saddle bag brackets on my bike. I didn't want to remove either the rear fender or the saddle bag brackets for the tank install, so I had to remove the rear wheel completely before I could clear the caliper from the swingarm. The instructions tell you to clear the caliper before removing the rear wheel completely.

The new tank fits the bike like a glove -- it utilizes every available nook oand cranny inside the frame. I am very impressed with the quality of construction and the look of the new tank on the bike.
 

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Registered
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I just finished my Rick’s tank install this weekend. The tech forum post said he did it in 2.5 hours. He must have had experience disassembling the rear end because it took me 2 days. Although I had to take breaks to watch football and to run to Sears and Home Depot for tools and a bolt. A couple of things that you need that you may not have in a standard tool collection:

30mm socket for the swing arm bolt
A bolt that fits in a 14mm wrench for the right side of the swing arm
Metric allen wrench set
27mm socket and a large adjustable wrench for the rear axle

After finding out that no store carried a Torx bit larger than 60, I did some reading on other threads about taking off the swing arm. Someone mentioned that a 14mm bolt and a pair of vice grips would work. I went to Home Depot, grabbed a metric wrench set and went down the hardware isle and started trying bolts that would fit in the 14mm wrench. I think I found a 3/8” bolt that worked. But not all the 3/8” bolts worked so you need to try a couple. After some trial and error I had to flatten 2 sides of the bolt on a grinder to get the vice grips to hold the bolt.

I also figured out that the exhaust bracket works for removing the tank flange. On the flange there is one notch that is thicker than the rest. Use that one to twist. I broke off a couple before I saw that one.

Charlieh is right. Removing the exhaust is much easier on the kickstand than on the lift.

Overall the install was ok. Definitely a job that can be done with the right tools and general mechanical ability. Being a mechanic in the Wisconsin Air Guard on the F-16 certainly helped me. The learning curve was pretty steep because I’ve never done anything with motorcycles other than change the battery and the oil. After 2 days, one large pizza and a 12 pack I am riding longer without constantly checking my fuel. Anyone in the Madison, WI area needs help, let me know. I like beer and pizza.

I hope this helps.
 

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Member #415
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1,712 Posts
curlerhaus said:
I just finished my Rick’s tank install this weekend. The tech forum post said he did it in 2.5 hours. He must have had experience disassembling the rear end because it took me 2 days. Although I had to take breaks to watch football and to run to Sears and Home Depot for tools and a bolt. A couple of things that you need that you may not have in a standard tool collection:

30mm socket for the swing arm bolt
A bolt that fits in a 14mm wrench for the right side of the swing arm
Metric allen wrench set
27mm socket and a large adjustable wrench for the rear axle

After finding out that no store carried a Torx bit larger than 60, I did some reading on other threads about taking off the swing arm. Someone mentioned that a 14mm bolt and a pair of vice grips would work. I went to Home Depot, grabbed a metric wrench set and went down the hardware isle and started trying bolts that would fit in the 14mm wrench. I think I found a 3/8” bolt that worked. But not all the 3/8” bolts worked so you need to try a couple. After some trial and error I had to flatten 2 sides of the bolt on a grinder to get the vice grips to hold the bolt.

I also figured out that the exhaust bracket works for removing the tank flange. On the flange there is one notch that is thicker than the rest. Use that one to twist. I broke off a couple before I saw that one.

Charlieh is right. Removing the exhaust is much easier on the kickstand than on the lift.

Overall the install was ok. Definitely a job that can be done with the right tools and general mechanical ability. Being a mechanic in the Wisconsin Air Guard on the F-16 certainly helped me. The learning curve was pretty steep because I’ve never done anything with motorcycles other than change the battery and the oil. After 2 days, one large pizza and a 12 pack I am riding longer without constantly checking my fuel. Anyone in the Madison, WI area needs help, let me know. I like beer and pizza.

I hope this helps.

Cool trick with the Exaust Bracket. :thumb: :plause:
 

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Color me Gone
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27,333 Posts
Cool trick but the tool isn't that much and you don't break off any ears on the flange. :) As an added bonus the tool works with the tank in the bike so you can clean the sensor strip without pulling the tank. You can also replace a fuel pump or flange in minutes instead of hours if needed later.

I have done a half dozen of the tanks now, start to finish is about 2 hours taking a nice slow pace.
 

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SOLD
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3,118 Posts
I finished my Ricks tank install this weekend. If I was not in such a hurry to get it done I would have purchased one of Max's flange tools instead I wrestled it off with a strap wrench
 

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lurch on two wheels
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296 Posts
Anyone know what the official size of the torx on the right side of the swingarm is? I can get my hands on a torx 70, but if this isn't the right size, I won't waste the hour drive each direction to get it.

-jt
 

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Premium Member
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6,248 Posts
JaredT said:
Anyone know what the official size of the torx on the right side of the swingarm is? I can get my hands on a torx 70, but if this isn't the right size, I won't waste the hour drive each direction to get it.

-jt
Your question only specifies the right side of the swingarm so I'm not sure what torx you're referring to but on most VRSC bikes after 2004 the right side swingarm pivot shaft takes a 14 mm (or 9/16") hex (not torx) tool to hold the shaft so you can remove or install the 30 mm nut on the left side.
 

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lurch on two wheels
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296 Posts
Yeah, I saw one post that called it a Torx and that got me worried, I have since found a few other posts that correctly reference it as the 14mm Hex. Thanks for the response tho!
 

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Registered
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Works on F-16's and uses the tank bracket, must be a government worker! ;-)
 

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lurch on two wheels
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296 Posts
Ok, now that I'm home and had a chance to actually look at my bike...

Where exactly is this 14mm hex at?

Or are the 2002's different yet again. If we are talking about the swingarm bolt, my bike has what appears to be a 30mm bolt on the right side and a 30mm nut on the other (1 3/16 is just a tad sloppy). The bolt is drilled and has threads on both sides.

-jt
 

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Registered
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It is under the cap on the swing arm pivot.
 
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