Harley Davidson V-Rod Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is more venting than asking for help.

Friday. I removed the front and rear wheels in preparation of new tires and new brake pads. Everything came apart very easily. I was was relieved because I had read the rear wheel was a PITA.

Yesterday I got my new tires mounted (internally balanced with beads) and got my pads (EBC sintered double H)

Today I installed the rear brake pads, not a bad job, just took me a minute to get the pads installed correctly.

Then I went to reinstall the rear wheel. Holy f**k. It IS a PITFA. Took me FOREVER to get it lined up. There's ZERO room for error. If I got the caliper and ABS sensor lined up, I couldn't get the left spacer in. If I got the left spacer in, I couldn't get the ABS sensor in.

After much cussing and somehow slicing my finger on the rotor, I got the wheel in and the axle through. Then I realized I had ran the brake line wrong and couldn't get the caliper back on the mount. FML.

TWICE I got the wheel in and realized I had something wrong and had to redo it. On the third attempt I got it all lined up and installed.

Then I screwed up again. I had had uninstalled the radiator cover to fix the fans. I had not reinstalled it yet, which meant the rear master cylinder reservoir was hanging loose. Without thinking, I pumped the rear brake to press the pads back out against the rotor. Since the reservoir was hanging down, I just pushed air through the whole system.

I didn't even get to the front brakes and wheel and called it quits for the night. Thank God I don't have to remove the rear wheel again for a few thousand miles. I think it will be easier next time though. I hope so anyway.

Like i said I got the rear wheel done, hopefully correctly. Just venting. Though I'm open to suggestions to make it easier next time, LOL.
 

·
"Vrod King"
Joined
·
847 Posts
Give it time. Things will come together. We all have stories kinda like that. :grouphug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,097 Posts
This is more venting than asking for help.

Friday. I removed the front and rear wheels in preparation of new tires and new brake pads. Everything came apart very easily. I was was relieved because I had read the rear wheel was a PITA.

Yesterday I got my new tires mounted (internally balanced with beads) and got my pads (EBC sintered double H)

Today I installed the rear brake pads, not a bad job, just took me a minute to get the pads installed correctly.

Then I went to reinstall the rear wheel. Holy f**k. It IS a PITFA. Took me FOREVER to get it lined up. There's ZERO room for error. If I got the caliper and ABS sensor lined up, I couldn't get the left spacer in. If I got the left spacer in, I couldn't get the ABS sensor in.

After much cussing and somehow slicing my finger on the rotor, I got the wheel in and the axle through. Then I realized I had ran the brake line wrong and couldn't get the caliper back on the mount. FML.

TWICE I got the wheel in and realized I had something wrong and had to redo it. On the third attempt I got it all lined up and installed.

Then I screwed up again. I had had uninstalled the radiator cover to fix the fans. I had not reinstalled it yet, which meant the rear master cylinder reservoir was hanging loose. Without thinking, I pumped the rear brake to press the pads back out against the rotor. Since the reservoir was hanging down, I just pushed air through the whole system.

I didn't even get to the front brakes and wheel and called it quits for the night. Thank God I don't have to remove the rear wheel again for a few thousand miles. I think it will be easier next time though. I hope so anyway.

Like i said I got the rear wheel done, hopefully correctly. Just venting. Though I'm open to suggestions to make it easier next time, LOL.
Not what you want to hear but it's quite easy with the right sequence. Get that wrong and you will fight the whole process. Key is having the belt off of the trans pulley and the bike jacked to the exact height. Caliper should be unbolted from it's frame and layed off to the side. With the rear wheel moved back just enough to allow install of left spacer and ABS sensor. You can hook the caliper frame into it's anti rotation slot as the first step. With wheel back, install both left space and ABS sensor, noting it's anti rotation device for location. Roll wheel forward to capture all components and far enough to reinstall the belt. Move wheel back to install axle and wiggle stuff as needed to go through. Compress brake pads in caliper and slip over the the rotor and line it up to the mounting bolts. Adjust alignment and belt tension to spec.
See how easy that was? Didn't even get my hands dirty. LOL
Ron
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,258 Posts
Get a service manual. It explains the nuances of this project.
'
Also
"Practice makes perfect"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Got it all back together yesterday and went for a nice long ride. Scuffed up my new tires and halfway to breaking in the new pads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,258 Posts
It's never easy no matter how many times you do it. You just start remembering the pitfalls and learn how to avoid them.
'
My 2007 has 185,000 miles on it. Guess how many tires I have changed.
'
And congratulations on the successful install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It's never easy no matter how many times you do it. You just start remembering the pitfalls and learn how to avoid them.
'
My 2007 has 185,000 miles on it. Guess how many tires I have changed.
'
And congratulations on the successful install.
I'd say more times than you care to count. LOL! Oh well, at least I don't have to do it again for (hopefully) several thousand miles!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,258 Posts
Just wait until you get a nail in your brand new tire. You will be less than pleased. Probably utter a few obscenities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Just wait until you get a nail in your brand new tire. You will be less than pleased. Probably utter a few obscenities.
That happened to my second rear tire:(
I had less than 200 miles on it. I decided to do a plug and see if it would work. It was in there even until the tire went bald about 6k later. It was a Soft tire, I don’t do burnouts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I read this from a previous post

stever975
02-27-2008, 07:39 AM
I have to make sure my belt tension is properly set... I don't have the stock the special harley tool yet.

Is the harley tool the best way to go about it? How do you guys go about setting up your belt properly?

Also the belt specs call for a 6mm deflection @ 10 pounds right? So is it better to keep on the tighter side of that spec or keep the belt a little looser?The Street Rod has a different belt deflection specification than the other VRSC models. Most of the VRSC models have a 127 to 142 mm (5" to 5.5") ride height and use the 6 mm @ 10 lbs force belt deflection specification. The VRSCR with longer shocks and a 170 mm (6.7") ground clearance has the swingarm rotated from parallel. This moves the sprockets closer together so a looser belt deflection spec. of 10 mm @ 10 lbs is required. These different static ride heights result in the belt on a VRSCR getting tighter with swingarm motion whereas it gets looser on the other VRSC models.

I don't think the "twist the belt" method can distinguish the difference between these two requirements. Running the belt too tight or too loose is not a good idea. The torque capacity of the belt drive is directly related to belt tension: too loose and the belt can't handle full power (loose enough and it will ratchet over the sprocket teeth putting severe load on the bearings and damaging the belt teeth), too tight and the bearings will suffer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,258 Posts
Never heard of a V-Rod with a model designation of "MW S1000RR bike"
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top