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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

I just bought a 2003 Anniversary V Rod! I'm an absolute noob with riding motorcycles so I'm taking a training course in a couple weeks and I can't wait to be able to ride this beauty. It came from the factory with a windshield (anniversary badge on it too) but the first owner took it off and sold it. Dang! I know it looks sexier without it but I don't want to have to wear a full face helmet and I don't want to eat bugs and gravel.

So...I went to V-Rod Windshield | Shop West End Motorsports and found what I think I need. It looks like I need the windshield (obviously) and a parts kit SKU:MEB8927. I think I might need "straps" or something like that too. Before I go and spend any money, does anyone have any advice or "watch out for's" I should know?

I don't have it in my possession yet but I wanted to get the order/shipping thing going so I will have it when I am ready to install it.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!
Thanks,
Joe
607361
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I saw a windshield posted for sale by
BraRiBo
but I do not yet have permissions to post on that thread. How can I contact him?
 

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That's a good looking bike! I saw it on Cycle trader. Congrats! It's a lot of bike for your first one. Be careful! Your bike came with solid wheels. You should probably trade me the ones on it for some so you can be original. Surely you want to. Hahaha! 57211-05 - Windshields Harley-Davidson® Parts and Accessories Here is an OEM touring windshield. They have a lot more sturdy and better looking docking hardware than any of the aftermarket ones. But the Memphis shades does have some nice ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks noechamp! I just ordered it! I actually saw that item on a couple other sites but they were out of stock. That site did not indicate they were out so hopefully it comes soon. I'll stick with the wheels I have. HA! FYI, the price for the HD shield was about the same as the Memphis Shades after adding in the mounting hardware so I think I'm going to be happier with the OEM item.

Just got the bike in my garage. It's a lot of bike but I'm taking a training course and I'm NOT confident...I'm scared actually. I will be driving miss daisy for a while until I learn what I'm doing.

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I really appreciate it.
 

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Welcome! And nice find!
As for advice.... practice, and patience. The training course is an excellent plan, just remember she is a heavy beast, with decent power and can easily bite you. Take your time, and have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey guys, thanks for making me feel welcome! I've dreamed of being in the HD world for years. This feels great. I went to start it last night to show my wife it's awesomeness and the damn battery was too weak to start it. It was in storage all winter on a trickle charger so when I bought it, it started right up. I got a new battery and I get to do my first bit of work on it! Isn't that part of the fun anyway? Ha!

Permit: check
Insurance: check
Registration: check
Scheduled training course: check
Excited: check * 10
 

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Hi all!

I just bought a 2003 Anniversary V Rod! I'm an absolute noob with riding motorcycles so I'm taking a training course in a couple weeks and I can't wait to be able to ride this beauty. It came from the factory with a windshield (anniversary badge on it too) but the first owner took it off and sold it. Dang! I know it looks sexier without it but I don't want to have to wear a full face helmet and I don't want to eat bugs and gravel.

So...I went to V-Rod Windshield | Shop West End Motorsports and found what I think I need. It looks like I need the windshield (obviously) and a parts kit SKU:MEB8927. I think I might need "straps" or something like that too. Before I go and spend any money, does anyone have any advice or "watch out for's" I should know?

I don't have it in my possession yet but I wanted to get the order/shipping thing going so I will have it when I am ready to install it.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!
Thanks,
Joe
View attachment 607361
I was going to buy this bike. I spoke with John about it and you got to it like an hour before me. Which is why I hate you. ( just kidding)
It did have high mileage, I think 36k and some change, but it's still very nice.

Here's my advice for you. You said it best when you said it's your first bike. And, Absolute noob.
And, I can tell. The motorcycle safety course will teach you a few things. It cannot account for experience. So it really does nothing.
The very first thing you should do is go out and buy a full face helmet, even though you don't want to. Shoei would be my first choice followed by Arai.
You're at very very high risk. This really isn't a bike for first time riders and noobs. In fact none of them are but this one is heavy and somewhat powerful.
You could easily lose part of your face and be disfigured for life and walk away from it otherwise unharmed. It's happened before. Many times. With riders far more experienced than thee.
This is only my third post on this site. When I saw this and after speaking with John, I felt like this needed to be said, particularly for you and with your well being in mind.
You would do well to get other protective gear as well. If you've never had a bad road rash, trust me when I tell you it will be one of the the most painful things you ever experienced in your life.
Especially on your back and under forearms. I understand there are things you do not want to do. However, my advice to you is very good and coming from a high level, very experienced rider.
In other words even with the MSC you're very high risk and a danger to yourself at this point. Many new first time bike owners say things like " I will be taking it easy and I don't intend to go fast" Which is a good thing. But consider this. An impact of only 10 mph to a dead stop is 1000 times worse on a bike than a car. You will go over the bars. You may break bones. And you could get rashed up pretty badly.
I'm not one of those safety loons either. It's just that I have been there. We were all you at some point early in our motorcycle experience.

Many years ago, I guess I was on my third or fourth bike ( race bikes). I had always used bargain helmets that weren't worth a crap. One day I was at a local motorcycle shop.
A shoei helmet caught my eye. It was solid black and beautiful and matched my RF900R Suzuki perfectly. I asked Robert the owner , " how much? He replied like 500.00. I says to him man, thats very expensive for a motorcycle helmet. That's when he asked me how much my head was worth. I bought it right there on the spot.Couldn't believe how much better it was than the helmets that I had been using. The ventilation was nothing short of amazing and it was quiet. Like eerily quiet. Fast forward 6 months or so, and that Helmet ended up saving my face, and my life when a kid pulled out in front of me. I was able to brake down to about 15 MPH. I went over the bars, hit the rear of the truck with my face head on, the shield was scratches and gouged from here to hell and then the back of my head slammed onto the asphalt. The state trooper working the accident immediately told me, after examining the helmet and the impact makings, that the Shoei helmet more than likely saved my life.
As he put it " Your head may have burst like a watermelon." Not to mention the deep gouge from something on the truck, dead center top of the helmet. And yes, I was road rashed badly for not wearing gear. Along with a separated shoulder.

Your new bike is beautiful. Really nice. Do as you please. But, I'd keep this little write up in the back of my head at all times if I'd be you. One last bit of advice. I would not ride that thing AT ALL in city traffic during your early stages of this. Take care of yourself. Be aware of anything and everything around you at all times. Learn to head check quickly before changing a lane. Always know whats around you.
Be well.....and live through this.
 

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ZX14 - Great discussion you gave there but the MSF course should be taken by all new riders, and no, it doesn't " do nothing" it gives the new rider the basic controls operation knowledge, balance, steering, starting and stopping etc. necessary beginner skills to start building experience on instead of an almost instant accident. You can't get experience without a proper start. Correct safety equipment and gear at all times, yes. Strong shoes with traction soles. Yes good gloves. Look at every vehicle, dog, animal, and slick or sandy spot on the road like they're aiming to take you out - because they are, so NEVER let your guard down. This M/C riding - although enjoyable, is a discipline not unlike flying a plane - one overlooked or neglected detail in operating it can get you hurt or killed, this is reality. Like an old crusty experienced fishing boat captain once said to a new young captain " It's Hard Telling, Not Knowing " which means if you don't have the knowledge of experience you won't recognize the level of the danger. So you have to build experience with every ride. Be careful but not paranoid Wingloader - always default to the safe position, if you're tired or drunk, don't ride it may not end well. Ride towards the country away from the crazy driver city and build your bag of experience, tricks and your new sixth sense for impending danger around you - And Enjoy it, safely - welcome to 1130cc.com as well ! (y) :cool:
 

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If you aren't someone who grew up from a young age riding a motorcycle. A beginners riders safety course is one of the best things you can take. You will get basic knowledge of the bikes systems and how to use them. If you are someone who grew up from a young age riding motorcycles. A BEGINNERS riders course is one of the best things you can take. Complacency is what gets most experienced riders in trouble. Many of them think they know everything. And none of them do. Time in the saddle can make you overlook a lot because most things have been seen before. A refresher course every now and again brings things back to your thought process when riding. I've been riding for 50 years and still take one every 4 or 5 years. They can be fun actually. There is a fine line between riding defensively and riding paranoid. Paranoid will take the fun right out of it. And could get you killed. Confidence is what replaces paranoia. It takes seat time to build confidence. Now that everyone here has scared the shit out of you.lol Go out and have fun riding your new toy. It is a blast!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ZX14R, that was a great sharing of knowledge and advice (you others as well). I have been flying hang gliders since 2001. I've had a few accidents and they were all due to bad judgement on my part. Yup, reconstructive surgeries etc. I went into that sport as the star pupil, first one off the high site, first in that year's class to get certified blah blah. My confidence was very high and I overestimated by abilities and it bit me right away, hard. Since that first accident, there has been mental baggage I've had to deal with. I am probably the most conservative pilot there is. It makes ever flight very difficult but because it can be pretty terrifying. Because I love soaring with the hawks, I take the risks for the rewards. I only fly a few times a year to make sure I don't lose my sharpness and keep up the muscle memory. There are two kinds of fear. Rational and irrational. Flying and riding SHOULD come with plenty of rational fear. The trick is to make sure the irrational fear is not being incorrectly lumped in with the rational fears and vice-versa. It takes a lot of introspection to make those judgements because it is different for everyone.

As far as riding goes, I already carry mental baggage for fear of months of surgeries and rehab (or death). If I listened to all the fears including the irrational fears, I'd have quit flying in 2001. I now only fly when the weather is PERFECT. I will only ride when the conditions are PERFECT. You have to mitigate the risks. I've read a bunch on this forum about Kevlar jeans, under-the-jeans body armor, helmets and ROAD RASH. I already ordered a Bell helmet that has a full "face shield" but it is not a full face helmet I wear a full face helmet when I fly and I effing hate it. I need the helmet before 5/14 when I need it to take the training course. Even though I have a helmet in the mail, I am going to go online today and get a full face helmet and the body armor to wear under my jeans. I also have armored gloves in the mail. When I see dudes on the local highways doing 85 with sneakers, jeans and a t-shirt, I mostly get a sense of pity because if something happens, the outcome is almost written in stone.

After my initial year of flying where I learned to fear/respect doing dangerous things. You can be assured that I will have my head on a swivel and I will by default assume everyone and everything is trying to kill me. The day I went out to John's to steal this bike from ZX14R :) , I was on a side road with just me and one oncoming vehicle. A guy on a scooter. Some bozo pulled out of a driveway in front of him. He swerved and avoided the collision. It was SO obvious he was there but the driver was just not looking hard enough. The driver of the car was not backing up either. Just pulled straight out in front of the dude on the scooter. This occurred less that 1 mile from John's house. I almost texted John that I changed my mind.

Unfortunately, I've lost some good friends to cancer (and flying). You do what you do because it is a passion and you take the risks with the rewards. When the risks outweigh the rewards, you stop. I fly very infrequently knowing the risks are really high and I mitigate them the best I can. It will be a long time before I ride in any kind of traffic. I plan to ride with a group of other guys and I have no notion of riding in traffic.

The really funny thing is, there are glider pilots out there who appear to be taking every risk with reckless abandon and they never have any issues...for years. It seems like a lot of times it's the really careful guys who take it for the "statistical team." I wonder if any of you have seen that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is me in 2004 just after an awesome hang glider flight. First time on a motorcycle :) Of course, if I fell off it would have been some grass stains. I know this contradicts everything I said above but I was going 2 mph and it was not a big bike. I don't think I went past first gear. The big difference between this bike and the V Rod is about 400 pounds and 100 hp. The risk here was worth the reward. Ha!
607405
 

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ZX14R, that was a great sharing of knowledge and advice (you others as well). I have been flying hang gliders since 2001. I've had a few accidents and they were all due to bad judgement on my part. Yup, reconstructive surgeries etc. I went into that sport as the star pupil, first one off the high site, first in that year's class to get certified blah blah. My confidence was very high and I overestimated by abilities and it bit me right away, hard. Since that first accident, there has been mental baggage I've had to deal with. I am probably the most conservative pilot there is. It makes ever flight very difficult but because it can be pretty terrifying. Because I love soaring with the hawks, I take the risks for the rewards. I only fly a few times a year to make sure I don't lose my sharpness and keep up the muscle memory. There are two kinds of fear. Rational and irrational. Flying and riding SHOULD come with plenty of rational fear. The trick is to make sure the irrational fear is not being incorrectly lumped in with the rational fears and vice-versa. It takes a lot of introspection to make those judgements because it is different for everyone.

As far as riding goes, I already carry mental baggage for fear of months of surgeries and rehab (or death). If I listened to all the fears including the irrational fears, I'd have quit flying in 2001. I now only fly when the weather is PERFECT. I will only ride when the conditions are PERFECT. You have to mitigate the risks. I've read a bunch on this forum about Kevlar jeans, under-the-jeans body armor, helmets and ROAD RASH. I already ordered a Bell helmet that has a full "face shield" but it is not a full face helmet I wear a full face helmet when I fly and I effing hate it. I need the helmet before 5/14 when I need it to take the training course. Even though I have a helmet in the mail, I am going to go online today and get a full face helmet and the body armor to wear under my jeans. I also have armored gloves in the mail. When I see dudes on the local highways doing 85 with sneakers, jeans and a t-shirt, I mostly get a sense of pity because if something happens, the outcome is almost written in stone.

After my initial year of flying where I learned to fear/respect doing dangerous things. You can be assured that I will have my head on a swivel and I will by default assume everyone and everything is trying to kill me. The day I went out to John's to steal this bike from ZX14R :) , I was on a side road with just me and one oncoming vehicle. A guy on a scooter. Some bozo pulled out of a driveway in front of him. He swerved and avoided the collision. It was SO obvious he was there but the driver was just not looking hard enough. The driver of the car was not backing up either. Just pulled straight out in front of the dude on the scooter. This occurred less that 1 mile from John's house. I almost texted John that I changed my mind.

Unfortunately, I've lost some good friends to cancer (and flying). You do what you do because it is a passion and you take the risks with the rewards. When the risks outweigh the rewards, you stop. I fly very infrequently knowing the risks are really high and I mitigate them the best I can. It will be a long time before I ride in any kind of traffic. I plan to ride with a group of other guys and I have no notion of riding in traffic.

The really funny thing is, there are glider pilots out there who appear to be taking every risk with reckless abandon and they never have any issues...for years. It seems like a lot of times it's the really careful guys who take it for the "statistical team." I wonder if any of you have seen that too.


I'm glad to see you taking it serious. I'd highly recommend Shoei. I even found one that will compliment your new bike nicely.
Shoei RF-1200 Helmet - Brawn

It flows air very very nicely and it's super comfortable. Plus you can get a transition face shield for it that darkens when it's bright and opens up at dark. Also comes with Pin lock to prevent fogging.
This is what I ride with. Arai is too tall at the shield for me. With Shoei I can ride east or west and tilt the helmet down a bit to block the sun, kind of like a cars visor. With Arai, I can't do that.
The paint job/clear coat on these is very very durable and high end. It will look brand new for years. It's also Sena, or Uclear compatible. If you want music, communications, or to answer phone calls inside the helmet via bluetooth. Pretty light and no buffeting. Bell is ok, but not nearly a Shoei. Yes I know you guys are all HD and prefer the little beanie caps. Which I will never wear no matter who tries to talk me into it. I already know what it's like to be hit in the face by a big horsefly at 65-70 mph. It's like being shot with a pellet gun in the face. And worse than that is a bumble bee if you get the good ole sting hit.

Group rides: Be careful here. There's always an oddball who wants to ride side by side instead of staggering. I've seen plenty of run ins on group rides. The guy in the front hits his brakes and the guy behind him doesnt have a fast enough reaction time. I've seen it at 5 mph all the way up to 60mph.or more. I've seen low sides when a guy goes into a corner hot, only to turn into a high side for the bike when it catches on something like a road reflector and goes airborne into the somersault of death which the Italian judge would score a perfect ten if it were an Olympic event.. I would also recommend DanTheFiremans youtube channel for you to go along with your safety course.

Sitting at a red light : When it turns green do not automatically go. There is always.......ALWAYS some douchebag who is trying to get thru the yellow light on the other three sides. And don't start to go when it turns green and then suddenly stop while thinking , I better look real good first. Because the guy behind you saw you let off the brakes and he's coming too. And may not have a fast enough reaction to re-stop until he plows into you on the back side at about 3 mph.

Running your new bike to " see what she's got." : There is a time and place for that. It's not from red light to red light. But rather when you can see about a mile ahead of you in a straight line. And preferable on a road with more than one lane.

I could go on and on. I somehow feel obligated to protect you and your new experience, I don't know why.............but probably because you stole my bike that I wanted. lol
But yeah........full face Shoei and I hope you never need to thank me for it.

I'm picking my new bike up tomorrow. It only has 259 miles on it! And it has a windscreen/windshield that I will never use. So if you have an need for it..........you know what to do.

Yours truly,
The guy whose bike you stole...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So if you have an need for it......
I do! I just ordered one from a HD dealer. It's on back order so I should be able to cancel the order. It's a waste of a windshield if you aren't using it. Let me know what you want for it.
57211-05​
Quick-Release Detachable Touring Windshield

As for looking out for me, I really do appreciate the sentiments. I will also order the helmet you suggested. I will try to sell the one I am getting. Prolly not a big market for used helmets. Even if it wasn't actually used.

Excited for you to pick up your new bike!
 

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I do! I just ordered one from a HD dealer. It's on back order so I should be able to cancel the order. It's a waste of a windshield if you aren't using it. Let me know what you want for it.
57211-05​
Quick-Release Detachable Touring Windshield

As for looking out for me, I really do appreciate the sentiments. I will also order the helmet you suggested. I will try to sell the one I am getting. Prolly not a big market for used helmets. Even if it wasn't actually used.

Excited for you to pick up your new bike!
It's yours. shoot me your number and I'll send it over
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's yours. shoot me your number and I'll send it over
Excellent. 716-481-9621.

I'm about to pull the trigger on the helmet. For the Bell helmet, I measured for an XL. My noggin is 24inches. Based on your noggin, does XL seem the right choice?

Is there a PM (private message) option on this forum? I didn't want to put the phone number out there but I didn't see another option. :)
 
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