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Posting From The Pub
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Discussion Starter #1
V-Gauge not talking to the bike reliably (revs and gear often frozen, and shift point setup being offered on start), engine light sticking on for a few seconds when bike started, voltage (on the V-Guage) showing as 11 when engine stopped and only 12.5 when running. Bike is a 2007.

I'd say three years is about right for a battery, and I should replace it before spending time on anything else.

I am open to flashes of genius however.
 

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How goes it Lou? You could very well be right about the Batt. 3 year's isn't bad. I'm not familiar with the V-Guage, but if it will show voltage. I'd check it and see what the voltage drop is when your cranking the engine. Typically even with a weak Batt. Voltage will still read above 12 volt's, running, with a properly working Alternator. Usually around 13.5 or 14. Does it crank over slowly? The first thing I would check tho. Is all the connection's. If nothing else, loosen them and tighten them back up on the Batt. Sometime's that alone can fix a bad connection there. Chances are, it's the Batt. Butt it's worth checking a few thing's first.
 

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Elephant Motors Rock
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If the engine light is sticking on after starting you also have a code set, you should check the code to see if it's reporting low voltage, I am betting that is what you'll see.
 

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Premium Member
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V-Gauge not talking to the bike reliably (revs and gear often frozen, and shift point setup being offered on start), engine light sticking on for a few seconds when bike started, voltage (on the V-Guage) showing as 11 when engine stopped and only 12.5 when running. Bike is a 2007.

I'd say three years is about right for a battery, and I should replace it before spending time on anything else.

I am open to flashes of genius however.
Yes, your voltage readings are too low.

Although the voltage value displayed by the V-Gauge is “adjustable” (via the “Factory Calibration” procedure as explained in the V-Gauge manual) if you haven’t messed with it I would expect to see no less than 12.6 V when the engine is not running, no less than 13.7 V at idle, and never more than 14.8 V above 3000 RPM.

Concerning battery life; this is more a function of how it’s used then number of years (I’m still using the same battery that came with my bike in 2002) but it’s not unheard of to need one at three years.
 

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Registered Idiot
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Nice to see a post from you, seems like it has been a while
Low battery does funny things to the electronics on these bikes, much more sensetive than autos. Mine got replaced this year, 5 years old, but I should have done it last year.
 

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Posting From The Pub
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Discussion Starter #6
Cheers guys, and yes, of course I should have checked the code! What a fool! Will do it tomorrow...
 

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can you pull the battery and have it tested by your local NAPA ?

how do u read the codes on a bike ?
 

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yeah battery care is really the main factor in how long a battery can last i have a buddy with a 06 r1 hes going to be putting his third battery in since he bought it bc he never plugs it in over the winter, the cold and not being used are the two worst things for a bat if your somewhere where its warm all year round and the bike is being used on a regular basis you can get 10 years out of a bat
 

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Blowin' Smoke
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2,647 Posts
I've never had a battery problem with my '02, but it never sets very long at one time. A few times in the winter it has sat for a month or more, but ran fine every time. I don't have an alarm, or other gizmo to drain the battery over time, so I don't routinely hook it up to a tender.

I changed the battery at five years because I was headed out on a long trip, it was five years old, and I didn't want battery trouble on the trip. Now, the second battery is three years old and has never had a hiccup.

I do:
1) Check, clean, tighten connections and grounds at least every oil change.
2) Make longer trips than just to the neighborhood minute mart.
3) Ride frequently, even in the winter, at least twice per month, far enough to thoroughly warm it up.
I don't:
1) Leave crap running that will run the battery down (power adaptors, alarms, etc.)
2) Let the bike sit ignored all winter.
 

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Posting From The Pub
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Discussion Starter #11
yeah battery care is really the main factor in how long a battery can last i have a buddy with a 06 r1 hes going to be putting his third battery in since he bought it bc he never plugs it in over the winter, the cold and not being used are the two worst things for a bat if your somewhere where its warm all year round and the bike is being used on a regular basis you can get 10 years out of a bat
Mine are kept somewhere pretty warm and used all year (I rarely use a car). I find I get three to four years :-( 2006 Triumph completely stuffed its battery in Feb (codes etc), 2007 V-Rod is clearly complaining, 2007 KTM seems OK so far, but I bet you it needs doing next year!

I blame the blasted alarms.
 

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K.I.A. '07 AW
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do you use a tender when not riding? If not, I agree that your battery is the most likely culprit.
 

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Pat (Patrick!)
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Posting From The Pub
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Discussion Starter #15
do you use a tender when not riding? If not, I agree that your battery is the most likely culprit.
I have a tender, which is on the Tiger, which is only used by guests and so sits idle in Winter.

The other three bikes have tender tails so they COULD be connected if I were ill or out of the country for a month or something, but that hasn't happened yet. My bikes are daily transport, each one will be used several times in a week, and messing about plugging them and unplugging them is not practical...

The Harley, in particular, is used daily.
 
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