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Still here, sort of
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17,374 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a few questions to gather some wisdom from the Forum:
What is better, the Bremo brakes on the V's now, ABS or linked braking systems?
How does ABS effect safety in a manner different than linking braking of the front and back wheels?
Anyone?
 

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The Hawk
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3,920 Posts
Hard to say without riding a linked system and an ABS system. A linked system puts on both the front and rear brakes at the same time, uses a proportioning valve to keep the right amount of power to each brake. An ABS system does the same thing but has sensors and a control computer that prevents the wheels from locking up and skidding. Normally on a car an ABS system will stop much quicker, and in a panic situation you can't lock them up and lose control. It would be fun to try the different systems on a bike just to see what works best.

Mike
 

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Premium Member
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2,721 Posts
ABS is good linked system's are not generally liked since there are times that you onlyu want to use the rear or the front.

The honda uses a system when the fronts are activated it brings on the rear and when using the rear it actiavates one of the front disk.

They were tired on the race bikes and did not last the season.
 

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mmmm Rrrrr
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319 Posts
http://www.msf-usa.org/imsc/proceedings/a-Green-ComparisonofStoppingDistance.pdf

http://www.ibmwr.org/prodreview/abstests.html

http://www.fim-cmt.org/oms-main/pagecomponents/article/uploads/ABS-article-2.pdf

Linked Braking System (LBS(TM)) uses a second master cylinder and a proportional control valve (PCV) to couple the three-piston calipers of the dual-front and single-rear brake discs for even better braking feel, while providing the peace of mind of an LBS system. Using the front brake lever activates the outer two pistons of the left-side front caliper, all three pistons of the right-side caliper and the center piston of the rear caliper. Rear pedal engagement activates the two outer pistons of the rear caliper and the center piston in the left-front caliper.
 

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The Massive Pr1ck
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2,633 Posts
Depends on rider skill. ABS offeres little to a highly skilled rider with good brakes, but can really help an unskilled rider explore their limits safely. Linked brakes are for those who either have either a physical disability or those who shouldn't be on a bike in the first place.
 

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EXCELSIOR
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8,575 Posts
The V-Rod doesn't have "linked" brakes. Some larger touring bikes do, Yamaha FJR, some Guzzi's, BMW's and others. It's when the front and rear brakes are connected to work from a single lever of pedal. Most applications link one front disc with the rear brake operated by the foot pedal, the remaining front is operated by the hand lever.
As for your rear, check fluid level, color, age, pad condition etc. all normal things till you find a culprit.
 

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VRSCD
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1,012 Posts
Depends on rider skill. ABS offeres little to a highly skilled rider with good brakes, but can really help an unskilled rider explore their limits safely. Linked brakes are for those who either have either a physical disability or those who shouldn't be on a bike in the first place.
Maybe, but even the most skilled rider can still end up in a panic situation under the worse possible conditions (contaminated road or gravel) where ABS will provide an advantage over non-ABS equipped bike.

Bottom line is, are you willing to bet you life on your skill? If ABS is available I'd opt for it because you can always ride the limit just before ABS activation and demonstrate your skills or you can grab and let the computer do the work for you.

I don't like linked systems, there are times I only want rear break application such as parking lot maneuvers (a la Ride Like a Pro) or on sand, wet grass or loose gravel. Front break application in these cases can put you down quick. IIRC Harley ABS only activates to breaks on the lever you squeeze giving you independent front and rear ABS.
 

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Premium Member
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9,332 Posts
Modern ABS systems are pretty fool proof. Unless you are an expert rider who threshold brakes regularly, like a road racer, then ABS can save you on occasions where you need to use a lot of braking on wet and/or dirty pavement. On a big touring sled where you have little front tire feel ABS can be a real life saver (plus you don't want your significant other injured because you were ham-fisted with the brakes, not a good thing).

Moto Guzzi invented linked brakes and to me their original system was particularly elegant and effective. The foot brake activated the rear caliper and one of two front calipers. The handlever operated the other front brake caliper. No proportioning valves, no master cylinder on the fork activated by torque on one of the front calipers feeding fluid to a rear caliper piston, and none of the problems trying to troubleshoot a problem in a system as diabolical as Honda's wretched linked brake set up. Guzzi's linked brakes are simple, elegant and actually very very effective. If you use the foot pedal only in rain it is just about impossible to lock the front tire before the rear, which is very safe. I like simple mechanical solutions. It is the only linked brake system I would ever consider.
 

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The Massive Pr1ck
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2,633 Posts
Funny that some here talk about the advantages of ABS on loose surfaces. My POS beemer's ABS has an off switch for riding on loose surfaces.

I do like the ABS for some things, like trying to fool it with different situations.
Fun things to do with ABS:
Slam the rear brake and then slam the front
Hold the front brake lever when the front comes down from a wheelie
Try to get the back off the ground without the ABS kicking in
Hit the brakes with both wheels in the air
Slam the rear while riding a wheelie
 

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Asatruar
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2,965 Posts
Rode an Guzzi I-Convert and an early Yamaha Venture, both of which had linked brakes that worked in a similar fashion. I truly detested that "feature."
 
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