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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I noticed a puddle of oil under my 2007 VRSCX (1250CC)

It appeared to be coming from the front left side of the engine. I assumed it was the traditional stator wires through the engine cover problem but got to doing some further inspections. Now I am not so sure. I have wiped the area clean using solvents etc in an attempt to locate the source and it appears to be coming from the split between the engine cases.

Picture one below shows a shard of what appears to be gasket material hanging from between the cases. It has a rubber like consistency and it stretches like a rubber band. However the parts manual does not show a gasket between the upper and lower engine cases.

Picture two shows a bolt that has oil drops hanging off it. It is the left front most bolt of the engine cases and is circled in the third picture.

Is there an easy way to fix this leak? I am confused that the parts manual does not show a gasket between the cases.

What would be the consequences of removing just that bolt and RTVing it like crazy? I am not knowledgeable enough, nor do I have the necessary tools/lifts, to pull the engine. I am assuming it is that bolt that is causing the drip but do not know for sure. In the meantime I have once again cleaned the area AND wrapped duct tape around the two wire bundles in the area that protrude from the engine in an attempt to isolate the drip location.

Any comments would be appreciated.

I should note the bike has 80K miles on it and the engine has never been pulled from the bike nor has the engine been torn apart.
 

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It sounds like your blow-out preventer failed.

You can deploy submersible robots in an effort to reactivate the blow-out preventer or employ the top hat technique to contain and siphon off the leaking oil until you can stop the gusher. If the bots fail to reactivate the blow-out preventer, you can try a top kill and plug the leak with mud. However, this technique has proven to have limited success under high pressure applications. To overcome this, you can try relieving the pressure by drilling additional holes in close proximity to the leak through which you can inject cement to permanently stop the leak. This process takes a bit longer and requires a great deal of precision drilling. In the mean time, you will have to put up with the messy leak and neighbors complaining about the nasty stain for bit longer.
 

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That is the RTV applied at the factory to seal the cases. It is common for a little extra to squish out during assembly. I doubt that is where the leak is coming from. If you look in the manual it will mention how to apply the case sealant in the engine rebuild section.
 

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There is no gasket between cases. Look at oil line going into front of case, oil filter, dipstick seal, and where starter goes into case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That is the RTV applied at the factory to seal the cases. It is common for a little extra to squish out during assembly. I doubt that is where the leak is coming from. If you look in the manual it will mention how to apply the case sealant in the engine rebuild section.
I don't ever want to look at the engine rebuild section of the manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is no gasket between cases. Look at oil line going into front of case, oil filter, dipstick seal, and where starter goes into case.
Oil filter is good. Dipstick is the chrome one with the temp gauge on it. I replaced it with the original plastic one today. Starter O-Ring has been replaced.

Put 100+ miles on bike today. Tomorrow morning will tell if my efforts were productive or not.

Oil Line in front of Case?????????????
 

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it sounds like your blow-out preventer failed.

You can deploy submersible robots in an effort to reactivate the blow-out preventer or employ the top hat technique to contain and siphon off the leaking oil until you can stop the gusher. If the bots fail to reactivate the blow-out preventer, you can try a top kill and plug the leak with mud. However, this technique has proven to have limited success under high pressure applications. To overcome this, you can try relieving the pressure by drilling additional holes in close proximity to the leak through which you can inject cement to permanently stop the leak. This process takes a bit longer and requires a great deal of precision drilling. In the mean time, you will have to put up with the messy leak and neighbors complaining about the nasty stain for bit longer.

put the remote control down! No one has to get hurt! Watch 5 episodes of "saved by the bell" you"ll be okay soon!
 

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You could sell the bike to me for 10 bucks. Youd have gotten rid of your oil leak and I would have a winter project. Everybody wins :dance::dance:
 

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Pat (Patrick!)
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Don't think of it as leaking oil, but as marking it's territory!:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oil Line in front of Case?????????????
Above and around the center of the starter.
Interesting. I just replaced the O-Ring on the starter and do not remember running into a OIL line. I will look again. There is something that always interferes with my removing the nut for the exhaust on the left front side. Is that it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Did you locate the leak yet?
I think so. I wrapped the two wire bundles protruding from the engine in Duct tape and cleaned the engine area real good. After a long ride and sitting overnight the leak was still there. No oil on the bolt or the front of the engine. The Duct tape wrap had oil dripping from it so I conclude it is in fact the stator wire issue. My next oil change (500 miles from now) I will reseal the wires using RTV gasket sealer - high temp.
 

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I think so. I wrapped the two wire bundles protruding from the engine in Duct tape and cleaned the engine area real good. After a long ride and sitting overnight the leak was still there. No oil on the bolt or the front of the engine. The Duct tape wrap had oil dripping from it so I conclude it is in fact the stator wire issue. My next oil change (500 miles from now) I will reseal the wires using RTV gasket sealer - high temp.
Don't use the orange high temp rtv it is Not for oil leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Don't use the orange high temp rtv it is Not for oil leaks.
Thanks for the warning. I will check out what I have. Never even thought about that.
 

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Buy American!
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BP's Got Nothing on Me!

I haven't posted this yet because I wanted to give it plenty of time to reappear before I declared victory, but...

I fixed it!!! I found a way to fix the stator wire problem without using RTV.

Mine was leaking a small puddle every night (embarrassing). For several months I read, inquired, and researched how to fix the problem without depending on RTV or replacing the stator (the wire and grommet are integrated to the stator). Humbly, I found no joy.

I decided to give in to using RTV. So I disassembled the stator casing and found that the grommet has two lip seals built into it. Redundant, but not the best design because there is no choice but replacement. Low and behold, there are three grooves in the grommet.

I got out my O-ring kit. Although it is a kit made for A/C repair (green O-rings), I found a size that fit perfectly. The groove closest to the end of the wire is useless. It is too close to the flange of the grommet to be useful. However, the other two grooves both sealed the leak well.

It has been two weeks and at least 300 miles since the repair. It doesn't even weep a little.

I declare VICTORY!
 
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