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Billy
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506 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I searched and read several posts on cleaning the VROD. Most every thread concentrates on products and tools used to clean and shine. What product if any protects chrome from humidity and/or condensation. I live on the coast of NC and the temperature swings throughout the year and this fricking 85% humidity is notorious for causing aftermarket chrome and OEM chrome to pit. I plan to use one of the oil filled radiator type heaters to reduce temperature swings in my non-climate controlled garage. I read the labels on several products from turtlewax to mothers and others that make chrome polish and a few say that they protect but they mostly state that they clean or shine. Weiman's stainless steel cleaners shines well and seems to leave a waxy coating but it is also billed as a cleaner. My current startegy is to keep it clean and dry and try to keep the temp moderated in the winter. Looking for some good tips, Thanks.
 

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USCG
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114 Posts
I hear ya.......

I live in Fort Lauderdale and its always hot and humid..... I wash the bike all the time (approx every 3 weeks) whether or not it needs it...I polish my chrome using Fllitz and just recently my buddys dad (long term biker) just showed us "old school" turtle wax chrome polish.....it works good.......My wifes bike (custom street bob) and my V are stored outside under HD covers and we have no problems.....just the stupid landscapers blowing dust under the covers.......
 

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_NoHighLikeMostHigh_
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2,132 Posts
....just the stupid landscapers blowing dust under the covers.......
Yes ugh landscapers. At work I will come out and there will be grass blown all over my bike like they did it on purpose. I hate that.
 

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K.I.A. '07 AW
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10,908 Posts
I've been using PigSnot for awhile now and highly recommend it. It can be used on paint, chrome, & bare aluminum. Does a nice job of keeping the brake dust from sticking to the wheels and bug guts from sticking to the other shiny parts.

 

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Premium Member
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1,063 Posts
I think you are on the right track with the regular washing. Like mentioned above, I use the the old school turtle wax chrome polish on the shiny stuff.

Anyone try the Harley Preserve Bare Aluminum Protectant wipes on their wheels? Just saw this the other day and was wondering how well it works.
 

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Registered
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53 Posts
I believe the regular washing is a big deal also. I also use an automative car washthat contains silicone, produced by a little auto chemical company in Lake City Florida. I believe that the silicone leaves a slight finish on all the various metal parts and gets into all the little metal on metal places on the bike. I have been using it for over 15 years on all my vehicles, including an 2002 Deuce and 07 VRSCAW. I'm in Jacksonville - nothing but humidity down here.
 

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durata membro
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17,603 Posts
Believe this or not,chrome is the protection.The best way to keep the chrome from peeling on the V-Rod is to make sure all the grounds are clean and making a proper connection.make sure aftermarket electrical items are properly installed.You can test the cooling system with a volt meter for electrolysis,and you can check the engine,and frame against the battery for proper grounds with the same meter.
 

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Billy
Joined
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506 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Believe this or not,chrome is the protection.The best way to keep the chrome from peeling on the V-Rod is to make sure all the grounds are clean and making a proper connection.make sure aftermarket electrical items are properly installed.You can test the cooling system with a volt meter for electrolysis,and you can check the engine,and frame against the battery for proper grounds with the same meter.
That is great information. I will check it out. I am not familiar with checking the ground with a meter but I will google it. Thanks a ton.
 

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durata membro
Joined
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17,603 Posts
I copied this,

Checking a ground wire. We'll use a car engine bay for example. This means it is secured to the metal portion of the frame or body. You can leave this one hooked up if it is secured by itself. When you Ohm this, put one lead on the end of the wire to be checked and the other on any metal that is also grounded in that area, usually the unpainted body or chassis will work. When you take the reading, it should be read continuity (0 Ohms). Basically you are reading from one end of the wire, through the metal frame, and then back to the meter to make the circuit.

and this,

Take a digital volt meter and connect the negative lead to battery ground and place the positive lead in the coolant in the radiator (do not touch any metal), you should not show voltage over 0.01V, if you do then change the coolant and try again.

Now run the motor with no accessories on and the engine running at 2000rpm, if you show voltage above 0.03v then you have a system leaking electricity into the coolant. Run the engine with all accessories on and watch the voltmeter as an assistant turns off the accessories one at a time, when the voltage drops below 0.01v you have found the circuit with a poor ground. Do the same test while cranking the starter, a poorly grounded starter can destroy the radiator and or heater core in a matter of weeks.
 

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Premium Member
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895 Posts
Sum time ago on "Trucks" hosted by Stacey David, he plugged a product that was 2 part sys. 1st one cleaned and 2nd one protected it. Could use it on any metal (Alum. & chrome). And according to the man. it would stay cleaned for over a year. I honostly cannot remember the product, but maybe this might help in your search?
 

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Billy
Joined
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506 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I copied this,

Checking a ground wire. We'll use a car engine bay for example. This means it is secured to the metal portion of the frame or body. You can leave this one hooked up if it is secured by itself. When you Ohm this, put one lead on the end of the wire to be checked and the other on any metal that is also grounded in that area, usually the unpainted body or chassis will work. When you take the reading, it should be read continuity (0 Ohms). Basically you are reading from one end of the wire, through the metal frame, and then back to the meter to make the circuit.

and this,

Take a digital volt meter and connect the negative lead to battery ground and place the positive lead in the coolant in the radiator (do not touch any metal), you should not show voltage over 0.01V, if you do then change the coolant and try again.

Now run the motor with no accessories on and the engine running at 2000rpm, if you show voltage above 0.03v then you have a system leaking electricity into the coolant. Run the engine with all accessories on and watch the voltmeter as an assistant turns off the accessories one at a time, when the voltage drops below 0.01v you have found the circuit with a poor ground. Do the same test while cranking the starter, a poorly grounded starter can destroy the radiator and or heater core in a matter of weeks.
Thanks for all the help. I will check it out.
 
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