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Discussion Starter #1
How do you prevent that little weave when you take off from a dead stop and what's the best way to keep your balance when driving really really slow (like rush hour traffic)?
 

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Full Speed Realtor
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I dunno - drive a car? Stop and go sucks on a bike, one of the only times that I'd rather be driving. The other you ask? In the rain.
 

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Riding around
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glz said:
How do you prevent that little weave when you take off from a dead stop and what's the best way to keep your balance when driving really really slow (like rush hour traffic)?
glz, the answer for me to both has been more throttle and feathering the clutch. more throttle = more stability, even at low speed
 

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glz said:
How do you prevent that little weave when you take off from a dead stop and what's the best way to keep your balance when driving really really slow (like rush hour traffic)?
Actually, I notice that my V Rod is MORE stable at very slow speeds than my wife's '04 Sportster or my "Rice Burner", and it's VERY easy to keep REALLY straight at VERY low speeds.

Never noticed a "little weave", most starts are STRAIGHT as an arrow.

EE
 

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Twisted!!!!!!!
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I don't get the weave. Maybe with a 28t sprocket very slow speed transitions will become trouble free.
 

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Training wheels was my solution. :angeldev:
 

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Fries with that?
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No "weave" on anything I ride, either.

Learn to "feather" the clutch... develop good throttle/clutch control and master the use of your back brake... makes slow riding a breeze. Find an empty parking lot and practice low-speed maneuvers until you're comfortable - these form the fundamentals of all riding.
 

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KBOlsen said:
No "weave" on anything I ride, either.

Learn to "feather" the clutch... develop good throttle/clutch control and master the use of your back brake... makes slow riding a breeze. Find an empty parking lot and practice low-speed maneuvers until you're comfortable - these form the fundamentals of all riding.
all that and dragging the rear brake a bit will help smooth things out. I am almost ready to try one of those slow races now ;)

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No lane splitting here. Cops really are down on it so your sure to get a ticket. The weave I'm talking about is that little left then right swerve that happens when starting up from a cold stop. I've seen it happen on all kinds of bikes and I've noticed I do it more often when I'm cold. I thought there was some kind of trick to reduce it. I'll try VAL's advice.
 

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For me it has to do with the acceleration rate. If I am able to accelerate at a decent pace, then there is no swerving. If it's a very slow take-off I do swerve alittle. It's all about getting the gyros (i.e. wheels) turning. The speed of the wheels is what keeps you upright and moving straight.
 

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it's easy when stopped to cock the bars ever so slightly, especially if you just have one foot down. i think that the other factor that effects this "weave phenomena" is having the clutch fully disengaged; you stand the bike up, lift your feet before your clutch enters the friction zone and for a fraction of a second you're balancing the bike while it's still standing still and as a result twist the bars slightly to keep your balance. you may want to try this and see if it makes a difference: when preparing to launch let out the clutch lever to the point just barely (a teeny, tiny bit) outside of the friction zone, start your launch from there and bring up both feet simultaneously. this is something, i too, have been trying to perfect and it still takes some concious effort on my part. let me know if it works for you. the slow speed riding stuff is all clutch / rear brake coordination and practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
bassist said:
for a fraction of a second you're balancing the bike while it's still standing still and as a result twist the bars slightly to keep your balance.
I think you've hit the nail right on the head. It's not a problem unless you have another bike right next to you at a red light. The other day i was riding with a few friends. Every time we stopped, conversation started which made for close grouping of the bikes. Every time we started everyone weaved just a bit. Although no one hit anyone It made me a little nerves. I hung back from the pack because it looked like no one really had very good control for the fist half second. Thanks again for the input.
Greg
 
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