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Service manual shows to flush the clutch, unbolt the resoivoir cover, fill up, hold the cover on to the resoivoir and pump clutch 5 times, hold clutch in and open bleeder valve. I did nothing but make a mess! Leaking brake fluid, unable to get more than a small squirt out a time. Gave up and broke out my mighty vac pump and made it really easy! Pump up the mighty vac, hold the line on the bleed sceew and crack it open. Unless some reason why I should follow service manual, will never try that way again!
 

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I vac bleed but in reality it will gravity feed if you have time. Just keep topping the master as the fluid drops. I'm not a fan of the pumping method either.
Ron
 

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VRSC est -03
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Read up by Ron. Thank you!

Mid stream 13s came with a new lid and new gasket and that's all the sell now. They are a bigger piece of shit then the early ones. I sourced a previous NOS 42855-06b and bought a few gaskets for a life time supply. These normally don't seep if torqued correctly. The latest 42855-06C version, I hate with a passion. Master for brake is powder coated inside and out side. Clutch master is only on the outside and bare inside. The lid and gasket has not been updated and is also not prone to leaking if torqued correctly. While the brake master lids are powder coated, I do not think the clutch master lid is and is likely to suffer the most from DOT4 attack.
Best install methods are to first drop fluid levels to middle of glass, make sure all surfaces of lid, gasket and master are bone dry. If wet, it will not seal long. This will require to rotate the masters on the bars to level them, then move them back later, to set fluid level and keep it all dry for install. Place lid on with gasket in the lid and gently hold in place. Turn each screw in until it JUST stops. If you don't have a torque wrench for these low numbers, turn each screw to 30 degrees, then turn each screw another 30 degrees. Each screw should end up at 60 degrees from the first contact point on the lid. Don't do 60 degree all at once per screw. You might get away with a hair more then 60 degrees final but it's pushing it and can crush the small area of seal around the screw area of the master body. 90 degree is too tight and will cause leaks. At the same time 45 degree is a tad light. Optimum is 50-60 degrees. One must set the 60 degree on the screw driver or actual torque wrench and walk away. This will give about .004 gasket compression from the total available of about .025 bottomed to the cover stand offs at the screw holes. Do not come back and give it a hair more. It will bite you every time. LOL Now in the real world of good design, these stand offs should be the compression control level. Turn screws in until it stops and done, the right gasket compression and no bs involved. We are not that lucky because the stand offs are not high enough by design and will allow over compression of the gasket and distort it especially around the screw holes.
Leaks start at the screw hole area of the gasket. Fluid migrates up and on top of the gasket. This will take some time to occur, should a leak happen. This fluid and or water that the DOT4 collects will end up on the top joint , lid side of the gasket. This is where the cap also has it's venting notches for above the gasket so that's why it shows up there. Rarely does it ever leak from the bottom joint first.
Can it be done leak free, sure. I would still like to kick the designer of this cap and gasket in the nuts, just because he deserves it. Years of the same old complaints, all because of a poor design, which I might add is shared with softails and touring bikes also.
Ron
 

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Best Bleeder for less than $2.00. You can pull a vacuum with one hand and watch for the fluid to come out clean and free of air bubbles with no mess.

 
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