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Frank
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4,314 Posts
*NOTICE*
New prices are now shown on the attached PDF file for all future orders. I will still make the kits by special order (no need for a batch), but the delivery will be 3-4 weeks.

Okay, I pretty much have everything together for the Front Fork Slam Kits. I will be offering 2 versions of the kit and they will include everything you need to replace your stock fork components and not have to modify anything so you can go back to the old setup at anytime. Please read the entire list of explanations (below) before deciding to purchase a kit and which kit you would prefer.

To give some background on how the system works and what you can expect from each kit, I will explain a few things:

#1 The overall travel of the forks (mechanically limited) is around 3.65” (with or without kit).

#2 The overall length of the 4” ram assembly when extended will take the same amount of distance as that currently taken by the hollow spacer tube.

#3 Since the 4” ram setup utilizes the same spring, compressed in the same manner as the stock setup, you should expect a similar ride.

#4 Since both of the ram assemblies take up much more volume than the stock spacer tube, you will need to remove oil from the fork (I recommend that you drain it all and refill (16oz) with HD SE Heavy Duty fork Oil)).

#5 The nominal compression of the springs (whether with kit installed or not) when the bike is supporting its own weight will provide around 3.2” of downward travel. That would mean that there is about .45” of upward travel before the limit springs are reached.

#6 When the 4” ram kit is installed and retracted, there is still a good amount of downward spring pressure being applied and while the forks will be at the limits of travel when standing straight, they will start to push out some when placed on a kickstand.

#7 When the 5” ram and shorter spring kit is used, the downward spring pressure in the retracted position is greatly reduced and the forks remain in the fully compressed position no matter if straight or on side stand.

#8 When the 5” ram and shorter spring kit is used, the rider will find the suspension to be somewhat firmer than with the stock spring setup.

#9 Installation does not require the forks or wheel to be removed from the bike, but depending on the air fitting’s final position when the cartridge is installed onto the fork tube, the tube may need to be rotated in the triple trees to permit a more direct attachment of the air line. EDIT... New fitting on order for kits has a swivel so you will not have to rotate the tubes at all.

#10 If the fork tubes are raised in the triple trees to achieve a lower riding position, care must be taken to insure that the fender does not hit the radiator shroud when fully retracted. This problem is compounded when a spoiler is used. But, as long as the forks are not much greater than 1” over the top if the trees, the clearance is fine.

#11 With either kit, when fully retracted and tubes adjusted so they do not cause the fender to hit, you will find that the bike is still not so low as to cause the frame or motor to rest on the ground.


Once you have decided to proceed, please print out the attached Word or PDF document, fill it in completely and sign and date it. Then scan and email it along with a PayPal payment and you will be on the list to receive a kit. If you cannot scan or email, please mail the signed copy along with a check to the address on the form (PM me so I can put you in line as well). Right now I am building up 10 kits. Once I have the 10 kit types set, I should be able to start shipping them within a week. Once those are committed, I will determine if another batch should be made.

The attached video shows the 4" kit in operations without the front wheel installed. There pictures show the 4" and 5" ram cartridge, the fully extended fork, the normal fork position and the difference between the stock and shortened springs.


First 10 on list to receive one:
1. rjrivero (5")
2. tapia (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-10
3. smoothrod (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
4. Vrod-Mike (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
5. 105VordRay (5") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
6. tailgunner (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
7. rev1up (5") Local pickup/payment/form SHIPPED 3-1
8. RVROD (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
9. ohioVROD (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
10. lokey (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3

Backup/Next batch
1. h20 (5") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-10
2. al-v-rod (4") Payment and form in the mail
3. Oz-Rodder (5") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-11
4. hafnutz67 (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
5. tapman22 (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-3
6. v man (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-10
7. Oz-Rodder (5") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-11
8. gmccauley (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-10
9. hidden name (4") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-10
10. o2man98 (4") Paid, form complete
11. Oz-Rodder (5") Paid, form complete SHIPPED 3-11
12. nelly (4") Payment and form in the mail
13. jspivey (5") Paid, form complete
14. mattj (4") Paid, form complete
 

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Friend of Max.
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21,715 Posts
Sweet Frank.

What are the working PSI's for this setup? Can it be used with a compressor for the rear of the bike as well? How hard is it to tune this in conjucntion with a rear air ride setup?

Don't tell my GF, but these are a MUST HAVE for me.

RJ
 

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Frank
Joined
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
rjrivero said:
Sweet Frank.

What are the working PSI's for this setup? Can it be used with a compressor for the rear of the bike as well? How hard is it to tune this in conjucntion with a rear air ride setup?

Don't tell my GF, but these are a MUST HAVE for me.

RJ
In most all cases, the front will require less air than the rear and it does not matter if you put more in, so you can use the same compressor and fill switch to raise the bike. However, I would split the lines past the compressor and run each through a check valve a seperate dump valve (can be powered by the same dump switch however). That way in the event of a line break or seal malfunction on either the front or the rear, the other end would be unaffected (and still rideable??).
 

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Frank
Joined
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have been getting a number of PM's about the difference in the kits and the ram length. It is not real easy to explain since you don't actually get more of a drop. Not exactly.... it sits down with more weight (more fimly) since the springs are further decompressed. Remember, the shock is limited to a 3.65" travel no matter what.

Unless you are planning to add something on the bottom of the bike so it will sit straight up when the front and rear are compressed (since you are still at least 1.5-2" off the ground), there really is no advantage to using the 5" kit.
 

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Chrome is king!!!
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20,269 Posts
Frank, it looks like you trim a little off the stock spring to make it fir right? Are you supplying the shorter springs or do we need to trim ours? I've never had my front end apart other then removing the handlebars. Will you be supplying installation instructions?
 

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Chrome is king!!!
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20,269 Posts
One more question.... what about the kickstand? Lowering the bike that much will make it unstable on the stock stand. Where can I get a shorter stand?
 

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Frank
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Vrod-Mike said:
Frank, it looks like you trim a little off the stock spring to make it fir right? Are you supplying the shorter springs or do we need to trim ours? I've never had my front end apart other then removing the handlebars. Will you be supplying installation instructions?
The 4" kit uses YOUR stock springs. The 5" kit includes springs that I have cut down and ground already.

I will be supplying instructions with lots of pictures. The actual install is pretty easy with the most challanging part coming when you remove the fork caps since they are under a pretty good amount of spring pressure even when the front wheel is off the ground. Going back with the new ram assembly is real easy since all the pressure is off.

If you decide to replace your fork oil instead of just removing some that is already in there, you will need to take off the front wheel and drain the oil out the bottom of the forks.... your choice.
 

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iTrader Technician
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4,467 Posts
Vrod-Mike said:
I've never had my front end apart other then removing the handlebars. Will you be supplying installation instructions?
:them:

Instructions would be great!
 

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Frank
Joined
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Vrod-Mike said:
One more question.... what about the kickstand? Lowering the bike that much will make it unstable on the stock stand. Where can I get a shorter stand?
Good question.... In my case I have spacers on the bottom of the bike and with my rear suspension I can sit the bike down without a kickstand. However, I do stll have a stand so I can park it without removed the air and be able to hop back on the bike and leave again without waiting for it to air up again.

If you plan to use a kickstand (as I suspect many here would), I don't know wher you can buy a short one, but I have shortened two of mine by removing them from the bike, cutting off a section, heating it with a torch, rebending it and pounding a flat section again. You may also need to move the rubber stop on the lower frame as well.

All I am doing here is offering the first set of critical components for dropping the front of the bike which until now was not available. For those wanting a turnkey setup and not have to worry about fabricating anything special, you can contact me about making custom parts for yours.
 

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Frank
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
BTW, if you plan to drop the rear of your bikes already, you should already be thinking about a shorter kickstand.
 

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Steve
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626 Posts
Frank, how will already having progressive lowering springs in my forks affect this setup? And also, how are you getting your bike to dump and refill that quick. I know my legend air kit is hella slow.
 

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Frank
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Please continue to ask questions in this thread instead of PMing me so that everyone can benefit from the answers.
 

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Frank
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
PHATVROD said:
Frank, how will already having progressive lowering springs in my forks affect this setup?
As I have stated in the previous therad, NO, it will not work with Progressive since they use much smaller spacers.
 

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Chrome is king!!!
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20,269 Posts
Where can I get an additional dump valve and T fitting to seperate the front and rear, but still utilize one compressor?
 

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(.)(.)Modster(.)(.)
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7,066 Posts
I have kind of the same question. I dont feel like taking my sliders apart again. Is it possible I can leave the extra seat spring from progressive on my seat pipe, but at the same time go back to my stock main spring and your kit?

Also will you provide any recommendations on the check valve, where and what to buy, etc? Maybe something you can supply for an extra cost? I'd like to tie it into my Arnott system.


PHATVROD said:
Frank, how will already having progressive lowering springs in my forks affect this setup? And also, how are you getting your bike to dump and refill that quick. I know my legend air kit is hella slow.
 

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Billy
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3,464 Posts
BAD V-R said:
As I have stated in the previous therad, NO, it will not work with Progressive since they use much smaller spacers.
Frank, I know that you had stated this before when asked about the Progressive lowering springs. Is this also the case with the Progressive stock length springs?
Thanks
 

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Frank
Joined
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4,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Vrod-Mike said:
Where can I get an additional dump valve and T fitting to seperate the front and rear, but still utilize one compressor?
Idealy, you could use the same one as was supplied with your rear air system. If that is not possible yuo can obtain valves from supply houses like Grainger.

Most air ride systems use 1/8" pipe fittings and either 1/8" or 1/4" nylon hose. The feed line to the front air line terminates with a 1/8" male pipe fitting. You can obtain various brass pipe fittings from sources like Home Depot or Lowes, but if you are already ordering stuff from Grainger you can get it from there as well.

Since I have been asked this question more than once, I am wondering if this is going to be a issue for many buyers. If so, I can look into suppying fittings, additional hose, dump valves and check valves for an additional charge. The biggest problem I see is knowing what you already have in the system and knowing only what you need to add the front air control.
 

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Chrome is king!!!
Joined
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20,269 Posts
BAD V-R said:
Idealy, you could use the same one as was supplied with your rear air system. If that is not possible yuo can obtain valves from supply houses like Grainger.

Most air ride systems use 1/8" pipe fittings and either 1/8" or 1/4" nylon hose. The feed line to the front air line terminates with a 1/8" male pipe fitting. You can obtain various brass pipe fittings from sources like Home Depot or Lowes, but if you are already ordering stuff from Grainger you can get it from there as well.

Since I have been asked this question more than once, I am wondering if this is going to be a issue for many buyers. If so, I can look into suppying fittings, additional hose, dump valves and check valves for an additional charge. The biggest problem I see is knowing what you already have in the system and knowing only what you need to add the front air control.

It would be great if you could supply everything. All I figure you would need to add it to a current system is a T fitting to split the line for the front and rear, dump valve for the front and then another T fitting to split the line to the two forks. Did I miss anything?
 

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Vendor
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5,940 Posts
Frank count me in, I will give you my final measurements tomorrow. Thank you very much for doing this.
 

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White is Faster :D
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1,704 Posts
Man I wish I new more about soleniods...this could be done quite easily with some electrically controlled soleniods. Paintball markers use small soleniods to control high pressure airflow via low voltage control boards.

1 air supply 100psi (intake) 2 air supply out (output to socks) each with a dump port. small control board to program pressure or dwell (estimated time to fill) for front and rear outputs. single release for both dump ports....
 
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