Harley Davidson V-Rod Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to the whole street riding thing and just want to be safe, handle the bike confidently and live and ride a long time. They are only $125 and may be good for an insurance discount too. Wadda ya think out there?
 

·
Biker Pilot
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Depending where you live, you may not get any insurance discount at all (or it will be minimal), BUT that shouldn't be the reason to take the course. i recommend that you start with a basic course (Motorcycle Safety Course) first and then move up to the Advanced rider course....assuming that you haven't done much street riding...the ones that I have seen are worth the money!!
 

·
Big Daddy!
Joined
·
975 Posts
Nothing can replace yrs of having to deal with real time situations in traffic, but the class is better then nothing:lick:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
924 Posts
I just finished taking the Team Oregon "Experienced rider course". I can't tell you how great the class was for me. It changed the way I approach riding. After 25 years of riding I thought I knew how to ride defensively. I learned so much more about controlling the bike at low speeds, stopping the right way, defensive maneuvers, what to do when you panic, and some statistic information you really cannot contest. Only about 2% of riders that have taken formal taining have had fatal accidents. Most that get into bad accidents are a result of not knowing what the best way is to control the bike. The course was $80, 4 hours in the classroom (2 short movies) and 4 fun hours on the track. I think I get more than half the cost credited against the HOG membership and a very small break on my insurance but the real advantage is I use something from the training course almost every time I ride.

I'd say to anyone that thinks the know how to really ride, take a class... The worst it can be is a refresher class, the best it could be is a lifesaver!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I would reccommend the class
 

·
Riding around
Joined
·
7,736 Posts
Took it last summer and plan to take it again at some point. I've even gone to the parking lot to practice the skills a few times. Some of it has been really useful - like remembering to pull the bike upright before doing an emergency stop in a turn, etc. I recommend it.
 

·
Fries with that?
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Take the BRC... get about 6 months' or 1000 miles' experience and then take the ERC. Education is never a bad thing - and like they say, 'the more you know, the better it gets"!
 

·
Check that P clamp!
Joined
·
686 Posts
I took the beginner course after ten years of riding experience and my wife who had never ridden did as well as I did. I was a little preoccupied swallowing my pride and un-learning some bad habits so I could concentrate on learning the techniques. A year later I took the experienced rider course on my 82 Wideglide and did well but I think the beginner class was actually better.
The ER course helps you find your own, and your bikes limitations on the street but the beginner course is where you learn how to ride properly and safely.
It's a small price to pay considering what you come away with.
http://www.msf-usa.org/
Let us know what you think if you take either course.
 

·
V-Rod Addict
Joined
·
271 Posts
There are a number of reasons it's worth the money:

  1. Learn safety (no one else on the road cares about you . . . you better care yourself)
  2. You get to practice slow-speed turns on someone else's' bike.
  3. After course completion take your certificate to the DMV and pick up your license.
  4. Most important to me: I had no prior riding experience so it gave me two days on a bike teaching proper technique and hands-on experience in safety maneuvers.

The rest that you need to learn is only by experience. Every time the cager does what I anticipate (pulling out in front of me) I appreciate that I learned to SCAN (if you've taken the course you all know what I'm talking about :) ) . . . in other words, be ready for them to do the idiotic.

One thing is for sure . . . I wouldn't take the course on a V-Rod. I don't think it has the turning radius for those slow corners!
 

·
V-Rod Addict
Joined
·
466 Posts
I took the Experienced Rider Course through MSF at a local community college. This reduced the cost down to $25 and HOG reimbursed me for the total cost in the form of a coupon for HD stuff or HOG membership renewal.

I enjoyed the class but wished there were more high speed (35MPH) manuvers. Most were at a relatively slow speed. Take the class it won't hurt.

By the way, I did not receive any insurance discount. My insurer told me the discount is only valid for people under the age of 26. Well that just sucks...
 

·
Fries with that?
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
It's a lot more challenging to maneuver and control a motorcycle at 5-10 mph than 35+. Once you get the fundamental technique down pat, it will become second nature to apply your new mad skillz at speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
I've taken the BRC before (years ago), and I'm taking the Rider's Edge class at my local dealership this July.
A friend of mine is getting her first bike as an anniversary present from her hubby. I told her if she signed up for the class, I would too. I think it will be good for both of us. I'm due for a refresher!
 

·
Dr. Funkenstein
Joined
·
557 Posts
I just finished the beginners course last night, for a refresher, and it was great! I would recommend it to anyone who hasn't taken it or have never rode a motorcycle.

I can't wait to take the advanced course on my own bike though.
 

·
V-Rod Addict
Joined
·
466 Posts
KBOlsen said:
It's a lot more challenging to maneuver and control a motorcycle at 5-10 mph than 35+. Once you get the fundamental technique down pat, it will become second nature to apply your new mad skillz at speed.
I agree that it is more challenging at lower speeds, but more accidents occur at higher speeds in the corners or during emergency braking. I would have liked more practice in those situations.
 

·
I seek only water...
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
In a word, it''s about confidence. I hadn't ridden in years and decided to take the course -- well worth it from a confidence building standpoint.
Ya can't afford to be enemic out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I think I was lucky in that the Basic Rider Course was the first time that I had ever ridden a motorcycle. If you know anyone looking to get into riding, there is NO better way than to learn it the right way the first time. People who've ridden for years can definately gain from it as well, but it's the newbies who'll reap the biggest rewards. Starting from scratch, I never got a chance to develop so many of the bad habits that some people have. As we all know, on a bike, 9 times out of 10 your body's initial panic reaction is the wrong thing to do. Getting that muscle memory down for the correct technique at the BRC before you learn anything else is really useful.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
413 Posts
I took the Basic Rider course in 2001 and it was the first time I had EVER been anything but a passenger on a motorcycle. That was how I fell in love with the thought of riding my own. I just took it in case anything ever happened to my husband, I would at least be able to move the motorcycle. I got a Buell Blast and rode it for 8 months and took the Experienced Riders Course. Now that I have the V-Rod, I want to take the ERC again on it.
I'm 39 (and holding of course) and we got a discount on our insurance for having taken it. I paid $50 for the ERC and got reimbursed $40 of it from HOG.
I really learned a lot at it and think later on "when I grow up" I might check into seeing about being a MSF instructor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Great response. Thanks. I've got my name in at the community college. They yet need 5 more riders to meet the minimum 12 to have the ERC. Every one in the Ocala area sign up at CFCC.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top