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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I am looking to replace my polished engine covers (cam covers, alternator cover, tranny cover, clutch cover, etc) with painted ones. Basically everything on the engine that is polished. I have the gaskets necessary I am just wondering if there is any extra fluid I will need or tips you may have. I would like to have everything available so I don't have to leave it in pieces over the weekend. Has anybody had experience doing this. Will their be fluids that need to be drained and filled. Any type of gasket material. I have the service manual but I didn't see anything about fluids so I wanted to make sure. Thanks for all the help.
 

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You will need to drain some oil, a quart or so, when you replace the alternator and clutch covers (The large ones on each side of the engine). Also coolant when you replace the water pump cover.
Existing gaskets should work.
 

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2" of dangling death
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Do it during an oil change to save, lossing the oil
 

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Buy American!
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You need a torque wrench or two to properly assemble the motor covers. Stripped engine cases are expensive.

When you replace your alternator cover, you may want to add a couple of O-rings to the grommet that passes through the cover. Mine was leaking and I found that the grommet has three grooves mad into it that are perfect for O-rings. Unfortunately, I just took them from my O-ring kit and didn't record the size. An air-conditioning type O-ring kit can be purchased from you local automotive store (I think that mine came from PepBoys). While you're there, pick up a can of Gunk Foamy Engine Brite.

For the cam covers, you will need black silicone RTV to glue the gaskets in place while you maneuver them over the cams. You will also want to have anti-seize lubricant to re-coat the rear axle while you have it loose and re-coat all of the muffler and exhaust bolts and faying surfaces. You should also re-coat the shock mount bolts and the front motor mount bolt with blue Loctite too. You also need to have brake fluid handy to bleed your clutch (make very sure that it is the correct DOT 4 or DOT 5 depending on your model).

Are you going to do a valve shim adjustment while you have them off?
 

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I installed a chrome engine cover kit on my 2007 1250cc. The only problem I had was with the front cam cover. You need to drop the engine down a couple of inches to be able to remove and replace that cover. This entails the need for a way to support the bike so you can remove the front engine mount so the engine can swing down. You may also need to loosen the drive belt and the muffler system to accomplish this. Depends on the bike.

You should be able to reuse the existing gaskets. Don't waste your money on new ones.

Follow the service manual religiously for the cam cover removal procedure. It's not complicated but the steps need to be followed in the order specified.

You will need a torque wrench capable of 86 IN/lbs and some ball end Allen wrenches as well as standard Allen wrenches, preferably the ones you can connect to a socket wrench.

Edited to correct torque value.
 

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You need a torque wrench or two to properly assemble the motor covers. Stripped engine cases are expensive.

When you replace your alternator cover, you may want to add a couple of O-rings to the grommet that passes through the cover. Mine was leaking and I found that the grommet has three grooves mad into it that are perfect for O-rings. Unfortunately, I just took them from my O-ring kit and didn't record the size. An air-conditioning type O-ring kit can be purchased from you local automotive store (I think that mine came from PepBoys). While you're there, pick up a can of Gunk Foamy Engine Brite.

For the cam covers, you will need black silicone RTV to glue the gaskets in place while you maneuver them over the cams. You will also want to have anti-seize lubricant to re-coat the rear axle while you have it loose and re-coat all of the muffler and exhaust bolts and faying surfaces. You should also re-coat the shock mount bolts and the front motor mount bolt with blue Loctite too. You also need to have brake fluid handy to bleed your clutch (make very sure that it is the correct DOT 4 or DOT 5 depending on your model).

Are you going to do a valve shim adjustment while you have them off?
This is not true. TO hold the gaskets in place use a couple of cable ties securing the medallions to the cover. This is documented in the service manual.
You should not have to remove the rear wheel or shocks, just loosen it enough to relieve the tension on the belt if the engine will not swing down enough to remove the front cam cover.
 

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Buy American!
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This is not true. TO hold the gaskets in place use a couple of cable ties securing the medallions to the cover. This is documented in the service manual.
You should not have to remove the rear wheel or shocks, just loosen it enough to relieve the tension on the belt if the engine will not swing down enough to remove the front cam cover.
My bad. You only need the black silicon RTV to fill the gaps around the medallions that are made into the gaskets. The cable ties are yet another added item to have on hand besides the RTV. I didn't use them as the RTV was sufficient.

Maybe you don't have to remove the shocks on yours, but I at least must remove the lower bolts on mine and swing them up out of the way. My axle covers are held in place by the lower shock bolts. In order to remove the lower shock bolts, I also have to remove the upper muffler. Naturally, if you don't have axle covers...

BTW, I was only suggesting that he remove the axle while he had it loose to re-coat it with anti-seize. Failure to periodically clean and re-coat the axle has lead to many being rusted and stuck. Since he is going to have to remove his entire exhaust system anyway, the anti-seize should be handy. Again, my bad.
 

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The smaller the cable tie the better. I got some from Home Depot that were less than 1/4" wide.

Don't forget to cut them off BEFORE tightening the bolts like I did.

PS: When answering questions, I always assume a stock configuration. Of course if someone has inadvertently modded their machine then all bets are off.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Everybody, thanks for all of the help. The guys on this site are such a help. I was planning on chaning the swing arm out also with a black one so I will be removing everything. I hadn't considered a valve shim adjustment, should it be something to look at? My bike has 10K miles on it, is it needed and even if it isn't needed would it help. Thanks.
 

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Everybody, thanks for all of the help. The guys on this site are such a help. I was planning on chaning the swing arm out also with a black one so I will be removing everything. I hadn't considered a valve shim adjustment, should it be something to look at? My bike has 10K miles on it, is it needed and even if it isn't needed would it help. Thanks.
If you are going to have the cam covers off then, by all means, check the valve shims clearances. Will take two minutes to check them. Will take longer if you have to adjust the gaps.
 

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Average V-rod guy
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After doing some PhD level research on this site (after a couple of years absence from it), I've come up with, what I personally think, in my opinion, is the greatest, as in cheapest, way to fix the notorious oil leak that occurs through the wire harness grommet that comes out of the alternator stator cover. A big thanks to Dr Dave for inspiring me to take this approach.

I've decided to take photos of my adventure with the hopes that many of you out there can save tons of money from having to purchase a whole new stator. Why, you ask? Because the grommet is an integral part of the wiring harness and is not sold by itself.

I have a 2007 VRSCDX with 15,000+ miles on it with various add-ons and some "tweaks".

The use of the RTV is optional but I decided to use it anyway for added measure. It would be akin to killing a roach with a hammer as opposed to your fist. Besides, it am no particular mood to redo this excercise.

Word of note: I would suggest removing ~2 qts of oil before peforming this fix and make sure the applicable areas are bone-dry of oil. The rest of the oil stays in the pan.

Oh yeah, I'm using three 1/2 inch diameter O-ring.
 

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Average V-rod guy
Joined
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580 Posts
After doing some PhD level research on this site (after a couple of years absence from it), I've come up with, what I personally think, in my opinion, is the greatest, as in cheapest, way to fix the notorious oil leak that occurs through the wire harness grommet that comes out of the alternator stator cover. A big thanks to Dr Dave for inspiring me to take this approach.

I've decided to take photos of my adventure with the hopes that many of you out there can save tons of money from having to purchase a whole new stator. Why, you ask? Because the grommet is an integral part of the wiring harness and is not sold by itself.

I have a 2007 VRSCDX with 15,000+ miles on it with various add-ons and some "tweaks".

The use of the RTV is optional but I decided to use it anyway for added measure. It would be akin to killing a roach with a hammer as opposed to your fist. Besides, it am no particular mood to redo this excercise.

Word of note: I would suggest removing ~2 qts of oil before peforming this fix and make sure the applicable areas are bone-dry of oil. The rest of the oil stays in the pan.

Oh yeah, I'm using three 1/2 inch diameter O-ring.
UPDATE: 30+ hard miles and NO leak.
 
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