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Discussion Starter #1
How much preload is there on the front fork springs?

The service manual does not say anything about using a spring compressor to disassembly the forks like on other Harleys. Just says to be careful when removing the cap as it is under load.

Also how much fork oil, the manual say to use a measuring tool and fill to a certain point.

I have bought a set of chrome sliders and I am considering doing the job myself.

As a minimum I will remove the forks and take to the dealer.
 

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curlysir said:
How much preload is there on the front fork springs?

The service manual does not say anything about using a spring compressor to disassembly the forks like on other Harleys. Just says to be careful when removing the cap as it is under load.

Also how much fork oil, the manual say to use a measuring tool and fill to a certain point.

I have bought a set of chrome sliders and I am considering doing the job myself.

As a minimum I will remove the forks and take to the dealer.
I just did mine today, it wasn't that bad. Major preload on the tops be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
VrodRick74 said:
I just did mine today, it wasn't that bad. Major preload on the tops be careful.
Thanks,

More questions:

Any tips on getting the top cap back on?

Did you use pvc pipe for a seal drive or ?

How much fork oil?

Did you measure like the service manual says or did you add a predetermined amount?
 

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Fork oil is measured without the spring spacer and washer in 3.3 inches from the top with the leg held perfectly verticle.

After you get the cap loose unscrew the cap with your hand a put it back out using just your hand. After you get the leg re-install into the triple tree tighten the nut.

Use a PCV pipe to install the seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just finished the job. Changed out the sliders to chrome. Not too bad a job. There was pressure on the cap but not enough that you can't get it on relatively easy with a helper (wife). Not a one person job unless you have a vise like in the service manual. The 2nd sure went faster then the first. One thing that the service manual doesn't cover is the dust seal. I had a hard time figuring out how to get it out. Once you figure it out its easy. Just use a medium flat blade screwdriver to pry the dust seal out. Had to make me a 6 milimeter hex wrench socket to get the bolt out of the slider that does not have a cap. My regular hex socket was to short and I did't want to use an impact on my long hex ball socket. Cut off the small angle part of a hex wrench and used a 6 mm socket. An impact make the bottom bolts come out real easy.

Used a piece of 2" sch 40 pvc pipe to install the seal. Had to use the old seal as a spacer to get the new seal in deep enough.

Sure glad I didn't listen to the parts guy and bought an extra bottle of fork oil. Takes about 3 1/2 pints to fill both forks.
 

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Just put on chrome sliders today. The first one took about 2.5 hours. The second one about 30 min.
As above, the dust seal isnt mentioned in the manual, but just pry it out (its under the decorative cap).
The thing that slowed me down was trying to get the seal and bushing back in the new slider. I tried using PVC as a slider, but it was just slightly too big. Spent way too much time sanding it down to where it would fit inside the slider. The second one went much faster by tapping the bushing and washer in first with a thin drift, then sliding the seal in after. The bushing is the hard part, not the seal.
As far as the spring pressure issue- Its not a big deal. You can feel how much there will be before hand by just compressing the tube assembly. It only wants to extend about 3-4 inches once the cap is off. I used a socket and rachet with one hand pushing down. Getting the cap back on is on the order of "pain in the arse", not hard, or dangerous.
The decorative dust cover caps were also a pain in the arse. Be carefull tapping them on. They bend easily.
But, now there on, and my fork is gleaming with 'mo chrome!
Worth the effort.
ps the front axle pinch bolts were only finger tight!! I have only 1600 miles on my '04. This is mentioned in another thread, but I didnt "read and heed".

:jeannie:
 

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I also want to install my chrome slides myself. Do I need the special tools mentioned in the shop manual? I wanted to use the bike as a vice along with a friend to help me. Do I need to replace the seals (like the shop manual says (only 2k miles on bike))? What about oil? Somewhere I read about using 10 to 15 weight fork slide oil (15 was recommended). I don't have an impact wrench. Am I going to be able to get the 6mm bolt out the bottom of each slide (just have a regular hex wrench set)? Your input would really be appreciated…

I guess I'm a little bit worried. Is this job better suited by the dealer? I'm usually good at this stuff but have never done slides before.
 

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>Do I need the special tools mentioned in the shop manual?
No, but I highly recommend a vice (and Im not talking smokes). I just used a vice with cardboard to hold the tubes. The slider would be nice, but you can improvise (I didnt have one).

>I wanted to use the bike as a vice along with a friend to help me.
Not recommended. You wont be able to put it back together in the vertical, and youll end up scratching your ride.

>Do I need to replace the seals
You should. They are only about $6 for a pair. For the trouble, its to cheap not to. Make sure your new slides are clean on the inside.

>What about oil?
I used the type E HD oil. It seems more firm than when it was new. I like it. I suspect it wasnt filled all the way from factory. When you fill it, pump it a few times and then wait for the bubbles to rise. It takes a minute. Then do it again until it no longer makes a wheez sound when you compress and extend it. It takes less than 4 pts.

>I don't have an impact wrench.
No need.

>Am I going to be able to get the 6mm bolt out the bottom of each slide.
Yes. You can use an allen key. That bolt will be the least of your troubles. It has Loc-tite on it, so it will resist at first.

As I said, the hardest part was getting the bushing back into the slider. And I found the best way was to tap it in with the washer above it, then put the seal in. The seal is not hard.
When you take the 6mm bolt out of the bottom, 2 parts will slide out of the tube if it is upside down.

Good luck,
 

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Thanks Sam,
I'm getting started this morning. I'll take some pictures as I go and add them to this thread. I think a lot of us have been scared to do this job. It's the only option I've had any fear to do myself.
 

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I need to rotate my dust covers (I dented them with my "attached" memphis shade lowers. I'm curious how one gets them loose!
 

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Daniii,
There is a notch on the slider. Just look all the way around the dust cap. Its a press fit. Take a drift and tap it at that notch to get it started, then work it around. They're sort of a pain to get back on- one side always poping up, then the other. Soft metal, so take your time.
 

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So its just a press fit?? Or does it unscrew. Boy, it it ever soft metal...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Press fit. It does not screw on. Shop Manual say use a brass punch. I didn't have one and used a 3/8" punch with a rag wrapped around the end. Sam is right they are a minor pain to get back on. I used the pvc pipe I used for the seal to get mine back on.
 

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Thanks guys!!
 

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glz said:
Thanks Sam,
I'm getting started this morning. I'll take some pictures as I go and add them to this thread. I think a lot of us have been scared to do this job. It's the only option I've had any fear to do myself.
How did it go? Any pics/tips?
 

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V-Man said:
How did it go? Any pics/tips?
It was easy. Just a few new tips (sorry, no pictures, hands where to oily), just read curlysir's instructions carefully. It required no special tools, just a 2" pvc pipe, no vice, just a rag on the garage floor and a friend to hold the fork assemble upright while working the top end cap off. I actually loosened the top fork caps while they where still mounted on the bike (a lot of fin threads so no worries of it popping off). NOTE: if you do it this way, make sure to loosen the top triple tree clamp BEFORE trying to loosen the fork cap. I also loosened the 6mm bolt at the bottom of the forks before removing the forks (these are tight and you need the support the bike gives to loosen them). Loosen the lower tree clame and remove the fork. Have a friend balance it upright. We backed out the top fork cap by putting a rag over the top (to protect your palm), then have your friend twist the fork slide while you apply pressure to the top end cap. It comes out easy this way and you can control the decompression of the spring (it will extend to about 4" above the fork slide). Have a bucket near to drain the fork into. Before continuing, make a mental note of the order the hardware is in as it's removed from the fork slide. You should also measure the level of the fork oil before anything is removed so when re-filling you know how high it was. Remove the spacer, washer and spring (Note the tapered end of the spring is pointed down). Now flip the assembly over and remove the bolt from the bottom and the rest of the dampener will come out of the top. Remove the dust cover, lock ring then seal (we removed the seal by repeatedly extending the slide until the seal popped out). Pull the lower slide off and replace it with the new one. Replace the seal (I used the old seal as a spacer and a 2" X 4' section of pvc pipe to pound the seal into place). Replace the dust cover. Now install the guts in the reverse order (there is an aluminum piece that goes in first, tapered side up). Replace the screw in the lower leg, fill with oil to the level measured earlier, then replace the cap the same way it was removed. Now slide the fork back into the triple trees to about 1/4 to 3/8" above the top tree. Tighten the lower tree clamp, then tighten the fork cap, then the top tree clamp. Do the same on the second fork and your done. It was about a 4 out of 10 on the hard to do scale. It took about 2 hours to do the first slide, about 30 minutes to do the second, 10 minutes to wash everything up and 30 minutes of just looking at them (looks real nice).

The only problem I had is I did not print out curlysir's instructions. The things to note are:
GET 2 quarts of fork oil (I used #10 weight). Each fork takes almost 1 full quart.
GET new seals.
When removing and replacing the top fork cap make sure you use a rag between your hand and the cap (my palm is hurting a little today).

Man does it look sweet with chrome wheels, calipers & hardware.

One last note, my personal taste may be different from yours but I don't think it would look very good without chrome wheels and calipers. If these are not already on or part of you bikes future I would think twice about the over all look. I will add a picture later today.
 
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