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Wretched Excess.....
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Discussion Starter #1
It’s been a while since I posted and while I found some time to work on my 16 Ga pipes (intended to have them done before last year’s rally), I thought I would take pics along the way and post my results.

I don’t know how my work compares to V-modded baffles but they have an incredible sound and with some basic adjustments to the base PC map, it seems to run pretty strong. The best I was able to do with my D&D slip-ons was 109.9 HP which was after I got some dyno time a few weeks after the rally. When the nicer weather hits, I plan on seeing what I can get out of these. I spent a considerable amount of time experimenting here so if you value your free time or don’t feel comfortable doing this type of work, you can always send your baffles to Chopper Steve and have him knock them out quickly.

After playing with different exhausts and reading feedback/performance results of the different exhausts available, it’s apparent that there is a very fine line between more free flowing exhaust for performance and opening things up too much and hurting performance. Some back pressure is needed and for that reason I decided not to alter the inlet of the baffle. The inlet cone if only held in with 3 small welds but I think it is wise to leave this in place.

The tools I used were:
A dremel with reinforced cut-off wheels
A 110V Mig welder
Die grinder with a metal burr and grinding wheel
Emery cloth

You should also be equipped with safety glasses and since you’re dealing with fiberglass wrap filled with carbon dust, a dust mask would be wise!!

After the baffles are removed, cut the clear tape on the fiberglass and unwrap the baffle as seen in the first pic.

There are either 3 or 4 welds as shown in the 2nd pic that must me cut through to release the outer baffle from the outlet cone. You’ll have to cut and examine the welds a few times to be sure you have removed enough of the welds to free the 2 pieces. I also used the cutoff wheel to cut a point of reference across the screen and the cone to help me line it up when I was ready to reassemble.
 

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Wretched Excess.....
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2,067 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
You can see what the baffle looks like when separated. The inner baffle has a plug on the inlet side which is nothing more than an automotive freeze plug. These plugs are held in with 3 small welds and I had removed them during a previous experiment. Removing the plugs helped with the sound but not to the level I was looking for.

The inner baffle is held in with 3 welds that must also be cut through. I used the dremel for cutting all these welds as I felt the smaller wheel gave me more control than my air powered cut off. Either one will work though.

Once the welds are cut, the inner baffles can be slid out of the output cone. If you had difficulty removing the baffles from the pipes and bent the end of the inner baffle, you might struggle getting them separated and you can always cut the inner baffle in half to make it easier.
 

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Wretched Excess.....
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2,067 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I then lined up the baffle cone with the screen using the reference mark I made and welded the baffle back together (I’m a hack when it comes to welding but I’m getting better). If you don’t weld, I’m sure you could run them over to a local welding shop and have the done for a reasonable amount.

Once back together, there was a difference in the size of the output cone and inside of the screen (outer baffle). I used a metal burr on my die grinder to “hog out” the cone to match the size of the inside of the screen. I finished it off with a grinding stone and then emery cloth to ensure the transition was smooth and would not interfere with the exhaust flow.

I rewrapped the baffles and secured the fiberglass mat with aluminum foil tape used for chimney and stove pipes. I used this tape so I could apply anti seize compound to the outer surface. The first wrap around the baffle is fiberglass cloth which will probably be pretty “ratty” and if you want to replace it, you can find it in the paint section of the automotive department at Wal Mart for just a couple of bucks.

Before reinserting the baffles, I cleaned up each end with emery cloth and coated each end and the tape surfaces with anti seize compound. With no inner baffle, there’s really nothing to grab on to in order to remove the baffles and I wanted to try to make it as easy as possible should I decide to do so.

The sound is incredible and the performance seems to be good. Can’t wait to see how the number look on the dyno after a final tune. Hope you find this helpful.
 

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