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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents-- a quick question:

Bike is a 2012 F. Clutch lever feel is "questionable". Engagement/disengagement are in the first tiny little bit of travel of the lever, i.e. when releasing clutch, nothing happens until almost the very end of travel. Clutch seems to work fine-- it's just sort of unusual that the lever has to be almost all of the way out before engagement?

Clutch has been properly bled with new fluid-- no change.

Not much adjustment on a hydraulic clutch that I know of (heh), and mileage is very low at around 10,000 or so, and I don't do burnouts, etc.

Any ideas? Is this "ops normal" and ignore?

No F's close to me that I can check against.

Thanks--

R.
 

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....
...Bike is a 2012 F. Clutch lever feel is "questionable". Engagement/disengagement are in the first tiny little bit of travel of the lever, i.e. when releasing clutch, nothing happens until almost the very end of travel. Clutch seems to work fine-- it's just sort of unusual that the lever has to be almost all of the way out before engagement?

Clutch has been properly bled with new fluid-- no change.

Not much adjustment on a hydraulic clutch that I know of (heh), and mileage is very low at around 10,000 or so, and I don't do burnouts, etc.

Any ideas? Is this "ops normal" and ignore?...
....
Yes, the VRSC hydraulic clutch is self-adjusting and release and engagement are always near the resting point of the clutch lever.

This is because the actuating piston in the slave cylinder always rests directly against the release "button". When the hand lever is pulled to release the clutch, the actuating piston immediately pushes the release "button" against the springs creating a gap that allows the clutch to slip. When the lever is released, the clutch springs push the "button" back moving the piston to the original resting position.

As the clutch friction plates wear, the springs will push back further on the actuator piston, eliminating any free-play (and forcing more hydraulic fluid back into the reservoir). One sign of clutch wear is a reservoir with excess fluid. When the clutch is worn out, the actuating piston will be pushed back far enough into the cylinder to hit the back without eliminating the plate gap causing the clutch to slip when the clutch lever is released.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Steve-- that's sort of what I thought, but its nice to have confirmation.

I've been riding my GS a lot lately and my F has been on loan to a buddy of mine; I got it back a few days ago and went "huh" when I engaged the clutch.

Nice to know there's no issue.

Thanks again.

R.
 

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I had this same question when I got my bike too. It has taken me a little while to get adjusted to it especially when I switch back to my FXR and have to pull the clutch all the way back. Thanks for the detailed response Stever975
 
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