Harley Davidson V-Rod Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Firefighter
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
this will be the first time i've ever changed a back tire, and i've only changed a front tire once.

what are any tips or tricks to make sure that the wheel goes back on straight and true?

or torq specs? belt slack?

anything else that i may be missing?

any and all help is apprecitated. thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
You need full support for the frame. 36 mm wrench/socket for the axle nut. Check the belt slack before you undo anything, this will give you an idea of how tight it should be. Use a marker to place a dot on the cams for reference.
If you have axle covers you will need to undo the lower shock bolts to remove them. keep the rear wheel touching the ground to take the tension off the bolts and remove. Remove the belt guards.
Undo the axle nut, slide the wheel/axle forward.
Remove the belt to the left. Remove the axle and hold the brake caliper from dropping on to the wheel.
Roll the wheel back and ease the brake caliper off. Keep an eye on the spacers and where they go.
Lift the bike a little more and roll the wheel out. Its not much more tricky than the front.
Change the tire, the rim marks easy so be careful and use lots of lube when changing the tire or take the wheel to the shop where they have a machine. The 180 tire is fair to do at home. The 240 is a bear!

Reinstall is the reverse. The rear axle nut is very tight 100 ft pounds. Belt deflection 1/4" at 10 pounds push at slackest point.

Watch the balance of the bike as this will change when the wheel is out. Check tire direction when installing. Check pressure and bead run. Don't bump the rim! check the spacers are all in place. There is one under the rear pulley.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,801 Posts
Use a ton of blue painters tape to protect the rim and caliper and swingarm. Everything scratches so easy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
this will be the first time i've ever changed a back tire, and i've only changed a front tire once.

what are any tips or tricks to make sure that the wheel goes back on straight and true?

or torq specs? belt slack?

anything else that i may be missing?
Service manual?
 

·
LIFETIME MEMBER
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
I would also add to use dyna beads for balancing your tire... I run them in all my bikes and have installed them in several customer bikes with no complaints... The manufacturer does not recommend using dyna beads for speeds above 130 mph but I can tell you that I felt no problems at 150 :)

http://innovativebalancing.com/motorcycle.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
Be really carefull with the caliper as CAPTJAM said when lowering the wheel, its so easy to scratch the wheel with the caliper. Its so much easier w/2 people....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,332 Posts
The hose to the rear caliper is quite short. There are some clamps on the swingarm that hold the hose in place. Pry these out a smidge and pull the hose out so you have some slack in it to wiggle that caliper out. Like everyone else said, tape is your friend, you will rub something.
I put the bike on the lift and start off with the tire just kissing the ground. Remove both belt guards. Tape like crazy, remove the rear axle, roll the wheel foreward and flip the belt off, then slowly lift the bike up as you finagle the brake caliper out. Lift some more and roll the wheel out.
Reverse the process to install. Be patient, after a couple of times the job becomes quick and easy. No, really.
Something I learned from a Victory service manual. Belts have tight spots like chains. I use yellow chalk and mark the belt on it's edge in four equally spaced locations. I measure the belt tension at each spot and choose the tightest of the four. I put the bikes weight on both wheels and adjust the belt at this spot.
While the belt gurards are off it's also a good time to inspect the belt for wear or damage. Flip the rear caliper over and see how much brake lining you have left.
 

·
Firefighter
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
wow thanks for the help guys!

i should get a service manual sometime, its on my list. is the torq spec really 100 ft lbs for the rear axle? seems crazy

and i have a lift that picks the rear end off the ground by holding the underside of swing arm. will this style of lift work ok?
 

·
Blowin' Smoke
Joined
·
2,647 Posts
I jack the bike up where I (I'm old, you know) can work on it and use a floor jack under the rear wheel. Then, I can move it around as needed and just let it down when everything is free.

Don't forget the keeper on the nut end of the axle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
wow thanks for the help guys!

i should get a service manual sometime, its on my list. is the torq spec really 100 ft lbs for the rear axle? seems crazy

and i have a lift that picks the rear end off the ground by holding the underside of swing arm. will this style of lift work ok?
I think the under swinging arm lift will get in your way. Best is under the frame. Look up poor mans center stand for another way to lift the bike.
 

·
Firefighter
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
really? i guess i'd have to look at it to find out for sure.

i changed the front tire with a couple ratched straps around the front end up to a rafter in my garage.
 

·
Killer Service Inc.
Joined
·
8,938 Posts
video link in Sig this is off my 03 a
 

·
EXCELSIOR
Joined
·
8,460 Posts
I used a Sharpie marker to trace on the swingarm around the wheel adjusters.
Loosen them when removeing and bring I them back even when snugging it back up. 35k miles and I've never had the tighten the adjustment beyond those first marks.
I've got a Harbor Freight bead breaker. Once the bead is broke on both sides the valley in the wheel is so deep that I can pull the tire off by hand.
 

·
MOVE !!!!!!!!
Joined
·
232 Posts
and i have a lift that picks the rear end off the ground by holding the underside of swing arm. will this style of lift work ok?
Yeah noooo its not a Street bike you cant pick that sucker up by the swing arms. You need something like this....I picked mine up for around 100 bucks. Oh and look at RSC signature and check out all of his videos on youtube. If will help you out where the book cant. Good luck.


Ben.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
really? i guess i'd have to look at it to find out for sure.

i changed the front tire with a couple ratchet straps around the front end up to a rafter in my garage.
Well you could strap it to the ceiling but the joists are not designed to carry a heavy motorcycle as a point load.

Harbor freight has a few motorcycle jacks as good prices, sears has a "pro" version. I saw a combo version for cars too. I picked up a sissor type off ebay for $100 for use on my ramp. Works great and takes up little room when stored. ebay #160514324250 But only use it for lifting one end at a time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,332 Posts
A swingarm lift won't lift the back up far enough to roll the back tire out from under the fender.
Buy the Sears lift and be done with it. You won't regret one penny of what you spent.
 

·
Firefighter
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
my dad has this lift...

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00950191000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2

and i tried to use it when i changed the front tire last season, but it wasn't lifting the bike from the frame rails under the bike, since the bottom side of the oil pan sticks out below the frame rails on an R. and lifting a 600+ lb bike brom the oil pan didn't seem bright.

although i do agree after looking at it, the swingarm lift would not allow the rear tire to come out, the dog a$$ sticks down alot farther than the rear fender does on a typical crotch rocket
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,332 Posts
my dad has this lift...

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00950191000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2

and i tried to use it when i changed the front tire last season, but it wasn't lifting the bike from the frame rails under the bike, since the bottom side of the oil pan sticks out below the frame rails on an R. and lifting a 600+ lb bike brom the oil pan didn't seem bright.

although i do agree after looking at it, the swingarm lift would not allow the rear tire to come out, the dog a$$ sticks down alot farther than the rear fender does on a typical crotch rocket
You might want to have a look at your engine mounts because the oil pan on my R does not protrude below the frame and I have great success using the Sears under lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
be careful when removing the shock nut as well. it can scratch the rear pully when loosening. use a thin wrench so you can see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
be careful when removing the shock nut as well. it can scratch the rear pully when loosening. use a thin wrench so you can see.
enjoy HD'S greatest masterpiece and dont be razzed by air cooled skeptics.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top