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Metal Guitarist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think it's the same thing as hotjet coating?
anyways, has anyone had their stock headers ceramic coated?
my buddies shop can do it for around $125-$200, it's done on the inside and outside of the pipes, supposed to keep all the heat in the pipe and not blue or change colors.
I am just wondering if it would be worth the money.
 

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Shawn,
Not to be a Jerk off but !Did you here the one about the Polish Gymnist that was so Proud of his Gold metal he won that he had it Bronzed! ;) Bare metal Yes !Already Chromed Factory Exhaust No! :yak: I'm Half Polish by the way! :alien: you would have to strip down the chrome finish to ceramic coat / jet Hot coat anyways I think so inless they were a Hacked up set it would be kinda weird?Who know maybe on a V-modded set Black Ceramic Coat would be Hot on a VRSCA/Black! :cool:
 

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I'm having a hard time understanding how any coating will keep heat in. It may distribute it so as to avoid hot spots, but its not much insulation. Even a great insulation just slows down the rate of heat transfer. Given enough time, heat will out. An air gap works because the heat "leaks" out with air circulation. I was once asked (when I worked for an insulation company) "how much insulation will it take to keep the pipes from freezing in my unheated cabin"? Answer - given time, they'll freeze, no matter how much insulation.
 

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Metal Guitarist
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
humm i was just wondering because my headers are turning a gold color. true you can not really see it with the shields on, but i can see it shinning on the chrome on my motor like a mirror. The heat does not bother me.
I know alot of race cars use the ceramic coating on the headers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey okie i seen that bike, it really looks sharp, do you plan on cutting designs in the heat shield?
 

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Daniii said:
I'm having a hard time understanding how any coating will keep heat in. It may distribute it so as to avoid hot spots, but its not much insulation. Even a great insulation just slows down the rate of heat transfer. Given enough time, heat will out. An air gap works because the heat "leaks" out with air circulation. I was once asked (when I worked for an insulation company) "how much insulation will it take to keep the pipes from freezing in my unheated cabin"? Answer - given time, they'll freeze, no matter how much insulation.

Daniii, the ceramic coating reduces heat-sink or heat transfer to the base/substrate material. Generally in cars, it helps keep under hood temps down. The pipes will still get hot, but not as much as plain/chromed/painted ones. It's great on turbo down tubes (into the turbos). On bikes, shielded pipes would be better for personal heat protection. Ceramic coatings will not discolour, and when dirty, the buff right back to shiny silver.
Torxila
 

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Riding the good life
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Ceramic coated pipes on harleys work just fine. I had this done to my 89 Sportster, and have been thinking about this for the v-Rod.

The process involves bead blasting the chrome from the surfaces, polishing of metals if you ask the processor to do this, which i'd recommend. The smother the surface, the better the finish.

The insides of the pipes do not get treated, as to get the spray device into the headers is not possible. They can reach areas that you can visually see, and no more.

The pipes are put into an oven, and baked on at a very high temp, somewhere around 1800 degrees.

The pipes I had done were the Python II series. They were done in silver, aind came out looking like a satin-silver finish. This finish can be polished to look like polished aluminum. They are easy to keep clean, as oil splatters come off easily with Mothers Billet Polish. The surface is tough, as it has stood up to vice-grips being clamped onto a small bracket that was on the rear-header, and no chipping had occured when I tried to see if the coating
would fail. The ceramic coating does not allow rusting or blueing to occur, and give the bike a different touch in the finish area.

The satin black probablly would polish out to a gloss black, similar to the aluminum. The finish is not really a gloss, kind of between satin and high gloss.

From what I read about the heat issue, the ceramic coating aids in breathing. What I read was that the heat remains inside the exhaust system, and aids in a higher flow rate somehow.
 

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Rich Moran said:
Ceramic coated pipes on harleys work just fine. I had this done to my 89 Sportster, and have been thinking about this for the v-Rod.

The process involves bead blasting the chrome from the surfaces, polishing of metals if you ask the processor to do this, which i'd recommend. The smother the surface, the better the finish.

The insides of the pipes do not get treated, as to get the spray device into the headers is not possible. They can reach areas that you can visually see, and no more.

The pipes are put into an oven, and baked on at a very high temp, somewhere around 1800 degrees.

The pipes I had done were the Python II series. They were done in silver, aind came out looking like a satin-silver finish. This finish can be polished to look like polished aluminum. They are easy to keep clean, as oil splatters come off easily with Mothers Billet Polish. The surface is tough, as it has stood up to vice-grips being clamped onto a small bracket that was on the rear-header, and no chipping had occured when I tried to see if the coating
would fail. The ceramic coating does not allow rusting or blueing to occur, and give the bike a different touch in the finish area.

The satin black probablly would polish out to a gloss black, similar to the aluminum. The finish is not really a gloss, kind of between satin and high gloss.

From what I read about the heat issue, the ceramic coating aids in breathing. What I read was that the heat remains inside the exhaust system, and aids in a higher flow rate somehow.
Rich, on your sportster, they didn't/couldn't coat the insides? I've had numerous car headers done and my V-Max 4-1 headers/Exhaust in & out. Just curious as to why they didn't do the insides. That's where the heat first hits.
Torxila
 

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Rich,
How do you go about polishing the coating?mothers billet or a polishing wheel with rouge?Have you polished any jet hot pipes?any pics?I have thought about it,but I don't want to take the chance of ruining the coating.
 

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Torxilla, I was told by the shop that did the coating that their application guns could not reach the inside walls.

The guy who did the spray coating advised the first couple of inches at the head side of the pipe does get the coating, which is the most important area, but from that point, diminishes rapidly in coating.

The exhuast side of the pipes have a bracket about an inch inside the pipe, than the baffle inside of it, so to try to get the coating through the baffle, its not possible.

I was told that they could soak the system, but they could not guarantee that the finish would be even on the exterior.

I would imagine that with a spray wand, that they could reach these inside areas, but this shop is the only one on oahu who does this work, and he does not hav wands of that nature.

How do they clean the inside areas for proper adhesion? I was advised unless the desired surface to be coated is totally sand or bead blasted, the coating will not adhere properly. I asked about acid etch, but they advised no, becuase that still might not remove what cuold be problematic surfaces inside the pipe. Remember,we are talking about something that is no larger than 2", and 3 feet long too.

V-Rodvinny, when I got the pipes home, I used fine steel wool to polish away the satin finsih. Then used MOTHERS Billet Polish for the finish. HotJet....Advise, what is this?

Photos, digital camera is in for repairs, but will shoot some images when I get it back.

I am planning on doing it again to the V-Rod this time, and am thinking about 2-tone coating. Black and silver combined, maybe into a silver flame on black background design. Thought about red on silver, but the silver on black would look best. I am not certain they can do this type of application, but will find out when problems on the OEM system show up.
 

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Rich Moran said:
Torxilla, I was told by the shop that did the coating that their application guns could not reach the inside walls.

The guy who did the spray coating advised the first couple of inches at the head side of the pipe does get the coating, which is the most important area, but from that point, diminishes rapidly in coating.

The exhuast side of the pipes have a bracket about an inch inside the pipe, than the baffle inside of it, so to try to get the coating through the baffle, its not possible.

I was told that they could soak the system, but they could not guarantee that the finish would be even on the exterior.

I would imagine that with a spray wand, that they could reach these inside areas, but this shop is the only one on oahu who does this work, and he does not hav wands of that nature.

How do they clean the inside areas for proper adhesion? I was advised unless the desired surface to be coated is totally sand or bead blasted, the coating will not adhere properly. I asked about acid etch, but they advised no, becuase that still might not remove what cuold be problematic surfaces inside the pipe. Remember,we are talking about something that is no larger than 2", and 3 feet long too.

V-Rodvinny, when I got the pipes home, I used fine steel wool to polish away the satin finsih. Then used MOTHERS Billet Polish for the finish. HotJet....Advise, what is this?

Photos, digital camera is in for repairs, but will shoot some images when I get it back.

I am planning on doing it again to the V-Rod this time, and am thinking about 2-tone coating. Black and silver combined, maybe into a silver flame on black background design. Thought about red on silver, but the silver on black would look best. I am not certain they can do this type of application, but will find out when problems on the OEM system show up.

These guys "claim" total coverage inside. When asked this is their response.

Yes, it is blasted inside and coated throughout.

Trade secret. I could tell you, but then I'd have to hire you.

Thanks!


Brad Gua
www.performancecoatings.com
253-735-1919
 

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Okie,

If I saw it with a fiber optic, I would believe it. There is no way to know that the coating gets all the way through the system other than fiber optics or destructive testing IE cutting the system in half to see how well the coating was applied.

I can see on a cast iron header system on an automobile, where the reach inside is no mare than a foot or so, it might be possible to reach the surfaces, nooks and crannies inside, but on the inside of a pipe that is as long as some of these are on the bikes, it would be tough. I am not saying it is impossible, as in the corrosion control industry we use spray wands that are quite long to reach inside cavities. The difference is the inhibitors we use have a high degree of migration to reach areas the direct spray cannot possibly reach under pressure. These would be areas where bends, folds, reinforcement plates and welds prevent direct application from striking.

I have never seen a destructive test report on ceramic coatings for exhaust systems, where someone actually did the work, then split the system in half to show that they actually can reach these areas.

When considering what is needed, the exterior is more damage prone than the interior, as most systems will fail from the outside in. I have seen instances where genset system header and exhaust have internal failure problems, as well as exhaust manifolds on power boats. Both of these systems are close, easy to reach areas to treat when the system is apart so it is easy to understand that these areas could be done in spray and inspected to be sure they are coated.

Was wondering if their claim shows this information? BTW, not trying to flame you at all, just trying to get a better understanding of their sales pitch VS what actually is the end result.

Anyway long-winded as usual.
 
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