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Discussion Starter #1
Compared to my buddies' Harleys, I have noticed that my front and rear brakes are not working properly. By this I mean that It takes a lot of effort to squeeze the lever and press on the foot/rear break to stop. My buddies also noticed it when we switched bikes.

I just took to for the 6.5k mile tune up at Ft. Lauderdale HD (what a nightmare) and they did not mention anything about my breaks.

What can I do to inspect them myself? Brake fluid levels? Bleeding brakes? Brake cable control adjustments? Your help is greatly appreciated.
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Greg/Moderator
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If you feel comfortable turning wrenches I'd check and bleed the brakes, I rode a 2002 fat boy and it has nowheres near the brakes that the V has.
 

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Tired of the crap
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Brake inspection is not that difficult.

First thing to check is your pad thickness: Minimum of 1.6mm on the front calipers, 1.02mm on the rear. For easy reference, 1.6 mm is about the thickness of a nickel, 1.02 about that of a penny. You can see the pads pretty easily by looking down on the top of each caliper.

For a bike that is less than 2 years old, you probably don't need to flush or bleed the brakes, unless air has gotten into the system. This usually shows up as a "mushy" feeling to the pedal/handle, and a lot more travel before the brakes start to grip.

Generally speaking "hard" brake controls are a sign of brakes in good working order - I'd be more concerned if it was easy to move the hand lever a long distance. As others have said, the brakes on the V-Rod are generally excellent. And as a general rule, you are MUCH better off doing the majority of your braking effort using the FRONT brake - maybe 85% front - 15% rear.
 

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Banned
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vroddrew said:
Brake inspectrion is not that difficult.

First thing to check is your pad thickness: Minimum of 1.6mm on the front calipers, 1.02mm on the rear. For easy reference, 1.6 mm is about the thickness of a nickel, 1.02 about that of a penny. You can see the pads pretty easily by looking down on the top of each caliper.

For a bike that is less than 2 years old, you probably don't need to flush or bleed the brakes, unless air has gotten into the system. This usually shows up as a "mushy" feeling to the pedal/handle, and a lot more travel before the brakes start to grip.

Generally speaking "hard" brake controls are a sign of brakes in good working order - I'd be more concerned if it was easy to move the hand lever a long distance. As others have said, the brakes on the V-Rod are generally excellent. And as a general rule, you are MUCH better off doing the majority of your braking effort using the FRONT brake - maybe 85% front - 15% rear.
I changed out my stock pads for a set of Kevlar pads, the bike brakes much better and feels firmer.
 

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Color me Gone
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If your brakes take more pressure then you think they should to stop that is usually a sign that the brakes are glazed or heated. If your rotors are blue then there is a good chance the pads have been over heated. This is not dangerous but usually a new set of pads is enough to repair the problem.

Max
 
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