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K.I.A. '07 AW
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Originally posted by Conan Dooley on BARF
Figured I would cut and paste a few tidbits here, but you can click on the link above for the full monty AND IT'S WORTH a read.

"Breaking in tires
Cold tires are slick. New cold tires are doubly slick. There is no longer any mold release used in the molds, however, the tires still have a very uniform surface out of the molds which will reduce available traction. On street use, one decent ride where the tires get warm and you slowly work up your lean angle will have your tires completely broken in. The trick is to slowly increase lean angle so that at no time while you're leaned over is your entire contact patch in the smooth section of the tire.

On the track, I've tossed on new tires, done the warm up lap, and gone racing. The very abrasive nature of a track helps the tires break in much faster. If your tires will come up to temp in a lap, by the end of the second lap your tires will be more than ready to go.

Heating up tires
The most common claimed reason for crashes is usually "cold tires". However, there's more to it than that. Not only do you tires have to come up to temperature, your rims and suspension must come up to temp as well. Cold suspension will react slowly, causing harshness, poor handling and potentially a loss in grip as a result. A hot tire on a cold rim (for example, on a windy day with tire warmers) can cause what feels like a sudden loss in available grip when the warmers come off and the rim begins to leech the heat out of the tire.

With that said, a cold tire crash is actually a failure of the rider to accurately account for the conditions, and never the fault of the tires.

How do you know if you have the right pressure? What you're looking for an increase in the range of 5-7 pounds from cold to hot. If you're getting too much increase in pressure, you need to boost your pressures to reduce the amount of flex in the tire. If you're getting too little increase, you need to reduce your pressures in order to get more flex and heat in the tire. While rubber balling up on the tire is fine, you don't want any tearing or gouging in the tire. Tearing and gouging can indicate either a problem with suspension, pressure or tire compound. Consult your local suspension expert and tire guy.


Weaving to heat up tires
Bullshit (click here). Motorcycles simply do not generate enough cornering load when weaving to build heat in the tires. The only way to get tires up to temp is to flex the carcass, with heavy throttle and brake use. If you want to get your tires warm, don't weave back and forth but instead speed up and slow down, accelerating heavily through first/second gear and braking heavily.

You will still see riders weave for 2 reasons: To feel out the bike, and to scrub off the tires.

Plugging vs. Replacing Tubeless Tires
On this front, I feel it's fine to patch a tire internally. However, I'd avoid plugging something near the sidewall. I've helped people limp home with the rope type plugs in their tires, to some success (they got home, it usually still leaked some air).

Other people will disagree and say that any plug is asking for trouble. I'd be fine with a plugged tire for commuting or casual twisty use. I wouldn't use one on the track. I have seen people use plugged tires in the C group on the track without any problems, however. "
 

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Good information.
 

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Premium Member
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Good post.

My previous bike, a 99 VFR, was bought brand new in Brooklyn, NY in February. The day I picked it up to ride back to central NJ, it started to sleet and a little later some flurries.

When the dealer said to take it easy, the tires are new and still have some mold release on them, I listened and babied on the turns all the way home!

Steve
 

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a mech. buddy warned me about new tires being slick. told me to ride easy for apprx. 30 miles, warm up the tires, then start leaning little by little till you wear off the new tire crap.
 

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K.I.A. '07 AW
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
that mold release crap isn't all that bad on dry roads, but on damp or wet roads it's like riding on slime.
 
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