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Discussion Starter #1
Guys -

I have the new slipper clutch ready to be tightened on.

Also, I managed to find the time to start welding the tool together to
hold the clutch from moving while I torque down the lock nut.

Question -

I need to rotate the clutch counter clockwise to make sure the prongs holding the clutch are setup so that I can mark out where the bracket that will bolt to the rear arm can be welded on.

Ok to rotate counter clockwise?

Thanks!

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I picked it up at the dealer when they had a 20% off on parts sale.

If you go on the HD website and look under your year, it's in the Screaming Eagle section.

For my 2003 it's: Part Number 37938-08KA

Steve
 

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I don't have my book in front of me but there is 1 direction you should not rotate the motor, Can't remember which. So as long as you don't rotate the motor backwards you should be OK>.
 

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I picked it up at the dealer when they had a 20% off on parts sale.

If you go on the HD website and look under your year, it's in the Screaming Eagle section.

For my 2003 it's: Part Number 37938-08KA

Steve
Thanks. I checked and it's the same for mine. Looks like I'll need the 2008 or later clutch instructions from the later service manual.
 

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Slipper clutch will fit all model years. You don't really need the clutch holding tool to remove and install. Put the bike in gear and hold the rear brake and use an air or electric impact gun on the hub nut. I admire your desire to make/modify your own holding tool though. If you want to rotate the engine and are unsure of the proper direction heres a trick. Shift the transmission to 5th gear and 'bump' the bike forward. If its on a stand just rotate the wheel as if it was traveling down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Slipper clutch will fit all model years. You don't really need the clutch holding tool to remove and install. Put the bike in gear and hold the rear brake and use an air or electric impact gun on the hub nut. I admire your desire to make/modify your own holding tool though. If you want to rotate the engine and are unsure of the proper direction heres a trick. Shift the transmission to 5th gear and 'bump' the bike forward. If its on a stand just rotate the wheel as if it was traveling down the road.
Perfect! Thanks. Now I can finish the install.

I'm doing this by myself and want to make sure I don't rotate the assembly as I torque down the locknut.

Steve
 

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Noel
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Guys -

Question -

I need to rotate the clutch counter clockwise to make sure the prongs holding the clutch are setup so that I can mark out where the bracket that will bolt to the rear arm can be welded on.

Ok to rotate counter clockwise?

Thanks!

Steve
Yes, this is safe, as the clutch basket spins counter clockwise it's spinning the crank clockwise when viewed from the right side.

The warnings you see in the forum or the service manual refer to the safe rotations as viewed from the LEFT side of the crank being COUNTER CLOCKWISE (viewed from the left side)

IMHO, having the tool that holds the basket stationary provides a sense of confidence that improper rotation will not happen when you're tightening the clutch nut.

As pointed out above it's possible to prevent counter rotation with tranny in gear and foot on the rear brake, just need a buddy or Ol'lady to stand on it while your tightening the nut.

Having just finished an engine build, I used the leverage of a breaker bar on the crank while having my heaviest set of clutch springs and lifter plate installed, I had enough resistance to torque to spec, but I did this before mounting the heads or stringing the cam chains so I had zero risk of jumping a tooth or braking a chain guide.

Good luck, BTW if you fab up one, and like it, make two and I'll buy the second one off you!:notworth:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just need to finish the "handle" to bolt the tool to the swingarm and I can torque down the locknut.

I'm not sure that I'm going to use red loc-tite on it, the cordless impact didn't have any issue with spinning it off and I didn't see any residue on the threads, but I'll at least put blue loc-tite on there.

Whether I trust the tool completely is another story :)

I'll put it in gear and also use the rear brake to be safe. I'm not the greatest welder, and it's been years since I've used it. The welds are holding the prongs pretty well, but the 120V welder I have didn't heat through all the way on the 1/8" tube for the prongs.

Thanks!

Steve
 

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When I was taking the nut off I had the impact gun on tightening the nut, and noticed that the clutch moved a little bit clockwise, is there a way to check if everything is ok still, or only when on the road (what is the effect anyway if the engine rotates)? She was in first gear and rear brake was on when that happened.
 

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When I was taking the nut off I had the impact gun on tightening the nut, and noticed that the clutch moved a little bit clockwise, is there a way to check if everything is ok still, or only when on the road (what is the effect anyway if the engine rotates)? She was in first gear and rear brake was on when that happened.
If the secondary chain tensioners are good in adjustment, it should be fine. Just about every time one turns these engines off, they slightly rotate the wrong direction any way. 45-90*, I wouldn't break a sweat over that. Keep rotating it, it could jump cam timing on the cyl not on compression stroke as it would have the valves under cam pressure.
Ron
 

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If the secondary chain tensioners are good in adjustment, it should be fine. Just about every time one turns these engines off, they slightly rotate the wrong direction any way. 45-90*, I wouldn't break a sweat over that. Keep rotating it, it could jump cam timing on the cyl not on compression stroke as it would have the valves under cam pressure.
Ron
Secondary chain tension-er adjustment check? :) I cant rotate it at all it is so tight..
 

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If the secondary chain tensioners are good in adjustment, it should be fine. Just about every time one turns these engines off, they slightly rotate the wrong direction any way. 45-90*, I wouldn't break a sweat over that. Keep rotating it, it could jump cam timing on the cyl not on compression stroke as it would have the valves under cam pressure.
Ron
Ron,

How do you check the secondary chain adjustment? It is a bit Chinese to me yet.. :)
 

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Noel
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Secondary chain tension-er adjustment check? :) I cant rotate it at all it is so tight..
Ron,

How do you check the secondary chain adjustment? It is a bit Chinese to me yet.. :)
The Secondary cam chain adjusters are within the two CAPS located on the rear/left side of each head which I hope you know need to be unscrewed from the head following a meticulous procedure noted in the service manual. You also need to use an HD tool to gauge the amount of chain slack, then according the tools readout, adjust the number of SHIMS inside the cap under the hydraulic adjuster also seated in the cap.
 

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The Secondary cam chain adjusters are withing the two CAPS located on the rear/left side of each head which I hope you know need to be unscrewed from the head following a meticulous procedure noted in the service manual. You also need to use an HD tool to gauge the amount of chain slack, then according the tools readout, adjust the number of SHIMS inside the cap under the hydraulic adjuster also seated in the cap.
I know those CAPS, although cannot see anything related to removing them in the service manual. I can see the adjustment marks and dots in the manual for the top end though so I suppose there is the secondary cam chain, since the primary chain is in the bottom.
Sorry for being a tick-head I have no experience with the engine parts of the bike. :)
 

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I know those CAPS, although cannot see anything related to removing them in the service manual. I can see the adjustment marks and dots in the manual for the top end though so I suppose there is the secondary cam chain, since the primary chain is in the bottom.
Sorry for being a tick-head I have no experience with the engine parts of the bike. :)
Maybe this will help. #2 4 5 are static shoes. 1 and 3 are hydro but the #3 are mechanically preset with shims to adjust the chain. Then the hydraulics keep the tension on from there. See the primary tensioner for the primary chain and the secondaries for the cam chains? Secondary tensioner shim setting is done with that cyl on TDCC. Tensioner taken out, tool installed in place and read the notches for amount of shims needed. Add shim (s) to secondary unit and install into head. This tool is all but impossible to find but I lucked out.
Ron
 

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I know those CAPS, although cannot see anything related to removing them in the service manual. I can see the adjustment marks and dots in the manual for the top end though so I suppose there is the secondary cam chain, since the primary chain is in the bottom.
Sorry for being a tick-head I have no experience with the engine parts of the bike. <img src="http://www.1130cc.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smilie" class="inlineimg" />
Maybe this will help. #2 4 5 are static shoes. 1 and 3 are hydro but the #3 are mechanically preset with shims to adjust the chain. Then the hydraulics keep the tension on from there. See the primary tensioner for the primary chain and the secondaries for the cam chains? Secondary tensioner shim setting is done with that cyl on TDCC. Tensioner taken out, tool installed in place and read the notches for amount of shims needed. Add shim (s) to secondary unit and install into head. This tool is all but impossible to find but I lucked out.
Ron
This is clear cheers, altough it seems this will be done by the garage if needed..
 

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I have to say this clutch is something, the shifting is so smooth, finding neutral is easy, clutch lever way softer, very precise. I could not go to a long ride since I have no fluid in the radiator, but as a test it was very impressive.
Probably my old one was crap as well, I will take it apart just to see but as a first impression I`m very satisfied.
thanks for the help to you all! :)
 

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I took her out for a long drive and noticed a strange thing, 1 out of 10 shifts the clutch wont engage. Mostly going to first and from 1st to 2nd, I just simply cant change gear, also can hear the gears grinding if I try to force it from 1st to second. Letting the lever go and pull again fixes it. When I got home I started to pull the clutch to see if I can hear the actuator pushing and yes no issues then. The line was bled 3 weeks ago, but it works 9 out of 10 anyway so I dont think there is an issue there.
Any ideas?
 

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I took her out for a long drive and noticed a strange thing, 1 out of 10 shifts the clutch wont engage. Mostly going to first and from 1st to 2nd, I just simply cant change gear, also can hear the gears grinding if I try to force it from 1st to second. Letting the lever go and pull again fixes it. When I got home I started to pull the clutch to see if I can hear the actuator pushing and yes no issues then. The line was bled 3 weeks ago, but it works 9 out of 10 anyway so I dont think there is an issue there.
Any ideas?
OK, so here's my long winded take on the matter. I suspect you meant it feels like the clutch won't disengage. Sounds like a typical 1st to second shift to me. I generally shift slower into second from first in normal easy riding. Almost like hit neutral then slip into second or like a slower shift sequence. If I get more aggressive, then yes there's a mini grind going in. It's the only gear that does it and none of the others either up or down. Some of this is design based and the gear speeds for shift dog engagement that cause that mini grind at certain rpm and rolling speeds.
All of the v rods I've ridden do this and all of them had slippers but I don't feel there's an actual connection to the clutch unless the locking ramps haven't quite released in a quick first to second shift. That's also a possible reason. All I know is if you hit neutral then second rather then ram through neutral there is no grind. Maybe that's just enough time for the clutch ramp to release. So, it could be a combo of both second gear design and speeds or the clutch ramping keeping a small amount of pressure on the plates so you almost do a mini clutchless shift. In either case, it's normal and no Amsoil will not cure it. LOL
Ron
 
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