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Just bought a VRSCSE2 and the previous owner wired a manual on/off switch for the fans. How do I know when to turn the fans on/off? As always your collective wisdom is appreciated.
 

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You would need to have a temp gage installed. Does it over heat? Because I can't think of a reason for the switch, unless there is a temp gage installed and the previous owner wanted the fans to come on sooner than the specified temp.
 

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You would need to have a temp gage installed. Does it over heat? Because I can't think of a reason for the switch, unless there is a temp gage installed and the previous owner wanted the fans to come on sooner than the specified temp.
Thanks for the reply, Rob. There is a P1481 code stored. How do I know when the bike is overheating? Dumb questions here but I'm searching. Thanks
 

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As far as overheating, the temp light will come on at 240*. Here's some info on the fans that might help. Code p1481 ? In a normal system where the temp senor controls the on/off fan operation, they come on at 217* and turn off at 208*.
Here's a link with more info on fans.
Here's a link for a manual fan switch if one desires it.
Ron
 

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Back when these were new, a number of talented fabricators made all kinds of cool add on and improvements. (I still have a wonderful little creation that allowed the two exhaust pipes to go into the middle chamber and attach to one drilled out Screaming Eagle muffler thereby eliminating one muffler and 20 pounds of ẅeight. I did over 100,000 miles with it on) Possibly what you have is the simple switch one owner made and sold a bunch of for $60. (Some of us also put on temperature gauges to monitor the antifreeze/fluid) I had one one on my 2005 - CVO. It was nice to have but not essential. When you're puting around town, stop and go, on a hot day, it was nice to turn on and get the fans started before the engine got really hot. Overheating was NEVER a problem, though, on a properly maintained V-ROD. When they were first being marketed, Harley posted an ad about one idling in an enclosed in area at the Bonneville Salt Flats on a 120 (I think) degree day for, (I think it was) 24 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Back when these were new, a number of talented fabricators made all kinds of cool add on and improvements. (I still have a wonderful little creation that allowed the two exhaust pipes to go into the middle chamber and attach to one drilled out Screaming Eagle muffler thereby eliminating one muffler and 20 pounds of ẅeight. I did over 100,000 miles with it on) Possibly what you have is the simple switch one owner made and sold a bunch of for $60. (Some of us also put on temperature gauges to monitor the antifreeze/fluid) I had one one on my 2005 - CVO. It was nice to have but not essential. When you're puting around town, stop and go, on a hot day, it was nice to turn on and get the fans started before the engine got really hot. Overheating was NEVER a problem, though, on a properly maintained V-ROD. When they were first being marketed, Harley posted an ad about one idling in an enclosed in area at the Bonneville Salt Flats on a 120 (I think) degree day for, (I think it was) 24 hours.
Back when these were new, a number of talented fabricators made all kinds of cool add on and improvements. (I still have a wonderful little creation that allowed the two exhaust pipes to go into the middle chamber and attach to one drilled out Screaming Eagle muffler thereby eliminating one muffler and 20 pounds of ẅeight. I did over 100,000 miles with it on) Possibly what you have is the simple switch one owner made and sold a bunch of for $60. (Some of us also put on temperature gauges to monitor the antifreeze/fluid) I had one one on my 2005 - CVO. It was nice to have but not essential. When you're puting around town, stop and go, on a hot day, it was nice to turn on and get the fans started before the engine got really hot. Overheating was NEVER a problem, though, on a properly maintained V-ROD. When they were first being marketed, Harley posted an ad about one idling in an enclosed in area at the Bonneville Salt Flats on a 120 (I think) degree day for, (I think it was) 24 hours.
This is very helpful. Thank you. I think I'll stop worrying about overheating so much.
 
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